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DirtyBird222
DirtyBird222 UberDork
10/4/18 9:24 p.m.

I like the idea irishj.

Maybe throw in an Odyssey as another variable. Ive seen guys towing their race cars with them. I was honestly about to buy one instead of this Sequoia I picked up for a tow rig. Sequoia was $4k less than the Odyssey I was scoping out so that made that decision easy. 

Also could talk about things that help out towing, like rear airbags for leveling. 

irish44j
irish44j UltimaDork
10/4/18 9:45 p.m.
DirtyBird222 said:

I like the idea irishj.

Maybe throw in an Odyssey as another variable. Ive seen guys towing their race cars with them. I was honestly about to buy one instead of this Sequoia I picked up for a tow rig. Sequoia was $4k less than the Odyssey I was scoping out so that made that decision easy. 

Also could talk about things that help out towing, like rear airbags for leveling. 

 

I think you were doing it wrong :)

DirtyBird222
DirtyBird222 UberDork
10/4/18 10:02 p.m.

Honestly was just talking to guys on my Chumpcar team about running an Odyssey as a second car just to piss off the people that take the series to seriously

frenchyd
frenchyd UltraDork
10/5/18 12:20 a.m.
irish44j said:
frenchyd said:

In reply to irish44j :

Too variable.  How much towing experience does the driver have? Anybody ever Driven a class A Semi with double bottom?  ( that’s 2 trailers ) 

after that anything is better.  

I’ve towed a 28 ft enclosed triple axle using a Big Mercury sedan  S10 Blazer ( and S15 Jimmy ) Chevy  2 ton truckcamper/ hauler. K1500 shortbox reg. Cab ( my personal favorite ) & F150 reg, cab shortbox  

i’m ignoring a few one off, like a 26 foot GMC Eleganza pulling a 24 trailer. A couple of Ford and Chevy Vans pulling various trailers.  

My point is a few races a year doesn’t really put a person in a position to make an unbiased judgement. 

Plus let’s be honest, some people need documentation and confirmation before doing anything.  While others tend to be more, “Well let’s try and see”. 

oh, I wasn't suggesting that we just take everyone's independent impressions. I was only suggesting that some GRM members could "provide" various older trucks for the test - but all of the rigs would be tested by the same drivers in the same methods (presumably a few GRM staff who are experienced at towing. 

Obviously truck condition is variable so the older vehicles tested would have to meet some kinds of basic requirements with regard to condition of suspension, tires, steering, brakes, etc. My intent was to assume that we are testing "well-maintained" older trucks/SUVs that are actually owned by enthusiast who presumably keep them in good condition - not just picking up some random old trucks off CL in who-knows-what condition. 

That’s probably the only way to do it with any validity. One or two well experienced drivers driving over a fixed course towing a lighter open trailer properly loaded and balanced. And then towing a heavier, max load situation. 

 The variable then is who did the work.  We all know the slap it together type and the opposite  . 

 

ddavidv
ddavidv PowerDork
10/5/18 6:45 a.m.

I don't think you guys know what 'old' is when it comes to tow vehicles. wink

Stock aside from dual circuit brakes and a manual disc upgrade. This setup worked well for me for several years provided you are willing to live with 'charming' features such as no a/c, manual steering and brakes and a 3 speed column shift transmission. Power brakes would have made stopping more pucker-proof but other than that is was very capable.

That said, as I crossed the age threshold of 50 I found the 'features' less than charming. Backing up a trailer with manual steering with no a/c in 90 degree heat after a weekend on the track grew tiresome. Thus:

Ahh, sweet luxury! Cloth seats! A radio I can actually hear at highway speeds! Cold air whisping from the dash vents! But luxury amenities and a slight power increase aside this truck really isn't light years better than the 1965. Still has loosey-goosey truck steering. Still gets 'meh' fuel mileage. Still requires regular fixing of old stuff that is wearing out.

If you aren't towing modern than ANY older vehicle will offer a similar towing experience. In other words, it will be old. Trucks haven't evolved greatly (at least not until recently). The above was a lateral move in cost (the Lightning was actually cheaper than what I sold the '65 for). Moving to a newer 'modern' truck would be multiple times more expensive but I am not convinced they are multiple times better. Older is easier to fix, certainly. Older trucks are built of stouter stuff. OTOH older trucks sometimes have parts that will break you can't find at AutoZone (ever need a clutch rod for a '65 F100?).

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