914Driver
914Driver MegaDork
12/19/21 8:44 a.m.

St. Petersburg, Florida, 1965, I was 12.  Old Mr. Covington lived a few blocks over and I rode my bike everywhere.  Mr. Covington had one of the weirdest looking cars in the world, pointy, small, unlike anything I've ever seen.  It was light years ahead of the behemoth 1958 Mercury Voyager 9 passenger wagon my parents drove!  Futuristic, Jetson-ish.   Sometimes he would roll it out to the driveway to sweep the garage, sometimes it was gray, sometimes it had white and pink spots, sometimes it was black.  His friend came over once in a while; he had the same car in white, a shiny white roadster with a red interior.  And his ran.  I could see them climbing all over this car, or sometimes they just stood there with cocktails and stared at it.

With the John Glenn experience, Sputnick, Cape Canaveral was hopping and  all the kids had ray guns.  My Dad was a glassblower at the GE Research & Development site, some of our neighbors worked at Honeywell, a big employer nearby.  I thought these guys were the next generation Henry Ford getting in at the ground floor of a cottage industry making spacecraft super cars in a tiny one car garage, I was proud to be a witness. 

A few weeks after Mr. Covington passed away I saw his three sons pushing the car up and down the street trying to get it running.  They were exhausted and the car just sat and smiled with that face.  When it turned over and made noise it didn't sound like a Beetle, possibly a Corvair.

I always wondered what happened to the cars and kept an ear to the ground for the Covington Motor Car Company.  Until yesterday.  I received January's Classic Motorsports and on page 65 is a picture of a Popular Mechanics' magazine cover with Mr. Covington's car on the cover!  Huh.  

Mystery solved, thank you and good night. 
And good night Mr. Covington wherever you are .....

 

Slippery
Slippery UberDork
12/19/21 8:50 a.m.

What was it???

wheelsmithy (Joe-with-an-L)
wheelsmithy (Joe-with-an-L) PowerDork
12/19/21 9:31 a.m.

A Covington?

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
12/19/21 9:48 a.m.

In reply to wheelsmithy (Joe-with-an-L) :

Hell, that's futuristic NOW!

Woody (Forum Supportum)
Woody (Forum Supportum) MegaDork
12/19/21 9:52 a.m.

In reply to 914Driver :

Cool story!

dj06482 (Forum Supporter)
dj06482 (Forum Supporter) UltraDork
12/19/21 11:32 a.m.
californiamilleghia
californiamilleghia UltraDork
12/19/21 12:57 p.m.

What motor did it end up using ?   there is mention of a Renault chassis  but also a Porsche motor.....

Mr_Asa
Mr_Asa PowerDork
12/19/21 1:00 p.m.

Tiburon is a good name for it.  It looks like a shark.

914Driver
914Driver MegaDork
12/19/21 4:39 p.m.

Holy E36 M3!  There was a Covington!   Well berk me.

914Driver
914Driver MegaDork
12/20/21 1:47 p.m.

I don't recall the neighborhood names, But Mr Covington lived almost across the street from Westgate Elementary on 38th.

Tim Suddard
Tim Suddard Publisher
12/23/21 10:57 a.m.

In reply to 914Driver :

Cool story. Thanks for sharing

Geoffrey_Hacker
Geoffrey_Hacker New Reader
12/29/21 8:44 a.m.

Hi Gang....

Henry Covington's wife still lives in the same house in St. Petersburg, Florida.  She's doing fine and in her late 90s.  My 1962 Shark roadster has been in my life since 1980 - just over 40 years.  And in that time I've acquired two more Shark roadsters and the coupe you see above.  We recently made molds of the coupe and will be starting our first build of the coupe in 2022 - the first new Shark coupe produced in 60 years.  I haven't shared that with the Covington family yet but....I know they will be thrilled.

Thanks again to Tim Suddard, Dave Wallens and John Webber for their interest and support in writing an article about what we do.  It's encouraging to know that others are interested in the rare cars we save and the histories that go with them - definitely a strong part of the American Automotive story that is getting better known with each passing year.

Happy Holidays gang...

Geoff Hacker
Undiscovered Classics
Tampa, Florida
Geoffrey.Hacker@Gmail.com
(813) 888-8882

 

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
1/14/22 11:34 p.m.

That is awesome. Glad that we could help solve a mystery. 

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