Joe Gearin
Joe Gearin Associate Publisher
4/21/08 12:23 p.m.
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Since the TR6's arrival in Florida, it has gotten frequent workouts. It really is a testament to the prep work done by the guys at Brit Bits that this 34-year-old car has required exactly nothing to keep it running. We haven't even changed the points, replaced a fuse or fiddled with the carbs. The TR6 just starts and runs whenever we ask it to. Since this fiesty old Brit seems to run better and better as the miles pile up, we decided that a nice weekend drive was in order.

The path from the Daytona area to Jacksonville, Florida, is usually a straight but effective slog up Interstate 95. This drive usually takes an hour to an hour and a half depending on traffic. I-95 is a typically boring, high-speed interstate crowded with semis and speeding half-wits trying to text their buddies while flying along at 90 mph. Lane discipline is nonexistent, and the pavement can be poor in sections. This is not the road to take if you are planning on enjoying the trip.

We instead decided to head west on Route 100 leading to Palatka, and then north, through the thickly wooded center of Florida on Route 17. This was the perfect choice, free of congestion, big trucks and speeding idiots. The TR6 loved the 45-60 mph limits and hummed right along. After a fun night with friends on Saturday, the return trip from Jacksonville on Sunday was idillic. We woke to beautiful 80-degree weather, sunny skies, and with Rufus the wonderdog as my co-pilot, this promised to be a great day. The trip went well, with the Triumph's melodic exhaust note eliminating the need for any radio during the drive.

Just outside of Palatka, on Route 100, we came across a sign simply stating "MUD." Peering through the trees, we could see a gathering of trucks in the field just off of the road. Curious, we turned around to find a mud bogging event going on. The massive field had been soaked with water to create a monster truck playground. Huge, insect-like tractor/truck hybrid machines crept through the deepest sections of the mud, pulling out the pickups that had bitten off a bit too much to chew. The very nice guy at the gate told us it was $10 to get in and play in the mud for as long as you liked. Dogs weren't allowed in, but he said we were welcome to look around a bit, providing the dog didn't leave the car. The fields were filled with massive mudding pickups: Broncos, Blazers, and purpose made swamp buggies. The atmosphere was great, with folks setting up barbeques, picnic tables, and basically settling in for a fun day of dirty fun. Everyone was friendly, and we did get asked a few times if were were going to take our funny Furrin car into the mud. We declined, but we may have to return with a big pick-em-up truck soon.

We got home around lunch time, really glad that we hadn't taken the interstate.

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Duke
Duke UltimaDork
8/11/09 2:32 p.m.

Dude, is that Roy Estrada from The Mothers' We're Only In It For The Money in your avatar?

If so, two massive thumbs up.

Rupert
Rupert HalfDork
5/22/13 12:56 p.m.

I just read the Funny Furrin Car article from 5 years ago. It was great!

And yes, living in Kentucky I frequently come upon unusual groups of people doing their own thing out in the country. I suppose my most asked question is "where do you hide all your guns in that little thing?" ("That little thing") meaning whatever I'm driving at the time. I have only driven "little things" since I sold my last American branded, notice I didn't say North American built, car in 1973.

What happened to the TR-6? I don't recall reading anything else about it.

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