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Story by James Heine • Photos as Credited

This MGA has seen the racing …

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johnstydo
johnstydo
3/6/19 10:05 a.m.

This MGA is nice but doesn't comply with vintage club rules for "period correct" production cars.  Would have to be in a "modified" class. 

Donatello
Donatello New Reader
3/6/19 11:02 a.m.

Perhaps more young people would be interested in vintage racing if it were clear that any car older than 25 years and generally period correct would be welcome. I am also interested in making the switch to vintage in my 30 year old car, but I am receiving mixed messages about how elligible a 1989 model would be. I think it's cool that people like Kent race the old stuff, but that is not where my interests are, and I know I am not alone in saying this.

russellsifers
russellsifers None
3/6/19 2:45 p.m.

I do not race but I do "run" my stock 1949 MG TC at the Lake Garnett Grand Prix Revival (www.LGGPR.org) every year in the Historic Group.  It is quite a thrill for a 71 year old guy to run a 70 year old MG and speeds up to 72 mph.  I do ponder who will maintain the breed after I am gone.

jwr914
jwr914 New Reader
3/6/19 7:51 p.m.

The first thing I look for when someone tells me their car is period correct is a working horn.  Never find one.

 

GregAmy
GregAmy New Reader
3/8/19 8:53 p.m.

Nice post, well done.

I'm making this transition now myself, from "srs bzns" (as-much-as 30 years or more SCCA Club Racing) to historic/vintage in a 914.

For me, the biggest part is mental, tightening that nnut behind the wheel; like Ken writes, managing the "intensity". My trick is to sit on the grid, under the five, and just look around me and tell myself, for example, "I am *not* going to be the guy that takes out that absolutely gorgeous E-type. He's buying the beer tonight, and I ain't'a gonna piss him off..."

wspohn
wspohn Dork
3/13/19 3:10 p.m.
jwr914 said:

The first thing I look for when someone tells me their car is period correct is a working horn.  Never find one.

 

My race car had one - hooked up to the brake light switch.  A tap on the horn as you are going into the tight hairpin turn with an adversary right on your ass seems to miraculously open up some space between you. Have to do it about where he'd expect you to start braking though......;-)

LanEvo
LanEvo HalfDork
4/10/19 11:37 p.m.
Donatello said:

Perhaps more young people would be interested in vintage racing if it were clear that any car older than 25 years and generally period correct would be welcome. I am also interested in making the switch to vintage in my 30 year old car, but I am receiving mixed messages about how elligible a 1989 model would be. I think it's cool that people like Kent race the old stuff, but that is not where my interests are, and I know I am not alone in saying this.

The organizers have caught on, even if they don’t do a great job publicizing the fact. They realize that younger people need to keep feeding into the club ... and younger people are generally more interested in racing an Integra Type R than a Hillman Imp.

I run a 1987 Mercedes 190E Cosworth in various vintage racing events. Clubs like VARAC in Canada have catch-all classes for “modern classics” like mine. The “Group 70+” class I run with is full of E30 M3s, 944s, various 911 models, Datsuns, and 2002s with engine swaps. The group has gotten so big that they’ve recently created a second class for even newer cars, like Miatas and E36s. 

dougie
dougie Reader
12/29/20 10:38 p.m.

We have Mazda Miatas racing in our SOVERN vintage club now. I'm still on the fence about the idea, but to keep vintage racing alive you have to be open to grow with the now 20 year-old cars. I think I just have seen too many spec "pinata" youtube videos where no one gives a sh*t about their car.

drBob
drBob
12/30/20 10:44 a.m.

After many years of "retirement" from karting and dirt track fun, I became a corner worker at Road America. One weekend I worked a vintage race and saw these old guys having a great time. A year and a half later, I had a Badass Devin and a yellow rookie stripe on the rear. That was over 30 years ago! Many vintage drivers and their family members are good friends. At 80+ I can still "race" a '60 Austin Healey but now, I largely go to see those those longtime friends and make new ones. That's the spirit of vintage. 

Tom1200
Tom1200 Dork
12/31/20 9:24 p.m.

In reply to dougie :

I recently ran my 87 Novakar F500 at 33 years old I'd say it's vintage. Miatas are 30 year old cars now. If it gets more people interested I am on board with it. I kind of like to have my old Showroom Stock C Miata, that car finished top 5 at the runoff and had some good race history.

I remember when Japanese cars were persona non grata at vintage events back in the 90s so I think it's appropriate that the eligibility rules evolve.

jefeingold
jefeingold
8/6/21 3:26 p.m.

It's hard to imagine poor Kent, all alone in the paddock with nobody to talk to. That's not my vintage racing experience, and I'm a serious introvert.

My VSCCA colleagues would certainly agree that, in addition to the cars (pre-'60) and the track action (civil), the personal and social aspects of our race events are why we do it. And much of that social activity occurs in the paddocks.

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