Carl Heideman
Carl Heideman
9/14/20 9:40 a.m.

We’ve restored scores of cars and found that organization is a key component to success. Countless stories and books have been written about restoration organization. Most advise keeping lists, making sketches, and using plastic bags to keep parts organized in boxes. 

While we can agreeā€¦

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Torqued
Torqued New Reader
9/14/20 9:16 p.m.

After a few costly mistakes, I developed a similar system myself.  I had a lot of extra parts for my MGA because a friend and who also owned an MGA moved out of state and give me all of his extra parts.  Over the years of work and travel while the MGA sat waiting prioper restoration I had ordered parts I knew I would need as they came on sale.  Finally retired, I began spending serious time on the project and I discovered that I had purchased parts that were already in the donated stash and were in perfectly good condition.  That was when I decided that I needed to go through it all and catalog everything.  I use an excell spreadsheet for the box numbers and contents. Makes it easy to sort and find parts.  With the extras I actually have three large shelves full plus some larger parts stashed in the loft, but that includes extra transmissions, wheels, hubs, trunk lids, fenders...  With it all organized and cataloged, I have avoided buying a part that I have in the stash several times now.  The shelves on wheels really help.  With limited space, the three shelves can be put side by side - no space between - then moved apart for access as needed.

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