frenchyd
frenchyd SuperDork
6/5/18 10:38 a.m.

Sitting next to the garage slowly sinking back into earth is a car you want to buy or sell. It seems there are two extremes of pricing. The I want it gone now and I have to get the absolute most money because my ego demands it.  

Every once in a while someone will insult you with a nasty roach and demand restored or near restored prices for something. 

It’s been a while since I was involved with a lot of buying and selling so perhaps things are different.  

When I sell something I always detail it as completely as possible. If I spend 20-30 hours detailing a car and can’t get a respectful offer in a week I’ll simply decide I wasted my time and be prepared to accept an offer reflecting that.  

On the other hand a roach looking car is scrap metal price top offer. 

So how do you get a top price for a car you want to sell? 

On the other hand, how do you get a price you want to pay for something you feel is overpriced?  

Dirtydog
Dirtydog HalfDork
6/5/18 12:38 p.m.

Initial condition, what you have in it, and bought it for,  and ultimate realistic value.   Then market for said vehicle.  Also, a big consideration is what's your time worth.   Sometimes it's tough making a purse from a sow's ear.

frenchyd
frenchyd SuperDork
6/5/18 3:48 p.m.

In reply to Dirtydog : when you buy a used car book value may not be realistic either because the book expired decades ago or the car in question is too far gone.

What have you found is a successful approach to getting the owner to sell at a price you’re willing to pay?  

Make a take it or leave it offer? 

Offer close to your top price but be prepared to increase it? 

Just ask how much?  

 

Dirtydog
Dirtydog HalfDork
6/5/18 7:39 p.m.

First, have cash to purchase.

Check the vehicle with your head, not your heart.

Have a ceiling on purchase price, be prepared to walk away.

Ask what bottom dollar is, and adjust your  buy accordingly.

And on the rare occasion, up the ante if it is a real gem.

I've learned the hard way to just walk away from trash.

frenchyd
frenchyd SuperDork
6/5/18 8:55 p.m.

In reply to Dirtydog :

How do you deal with after the deal surprises

. “ I’ve lost the tittle but I’ll give you a bill of sale”  

“ the wheels/tires/ engine  something aren’t included”

“ I’ll have to get - somebodies- approval to sell at that price” 

Dirtydog
Dirtydog HalfDork
6/5/18 11:22 p.m.

Questions like these should be asked at first blush.  I'd dare say, at our age, we should have a feel for character. If it looks, and smells like poop, step around it.

frenchyd
frenchyd SuperDork
6/6/18 7:40 a.m.

In reply to Dirtydog :

Good point.  Although I’ve been guilty of wanting to buy a car for parts rather than pay junkyard prices and accepting a less than perfect deal for a lower price.  

SLGGR
SLGGR New Reader
6/12/18 10:26 p.m.
frenchyd said:

In reply to Dirtydog :

How do you deal with after the deal surprises

. “ I’ve lost the tittle but I’ll give you a bill of sale”  

“ the wheels/tires/ engine  something aren’t included”

“ I’ll have to get - somebodies- approval to sell at that price” 

No title, no buy.   Too many potential problems with government stooges to accept that risk.

wheels tires engine not included?  Not sure how they wouldn’t have been hashed out previously.   If not dealt with previously, no deal.   

Consignments or reps are no big deal.   Make the offer you’re good with and stick to it, prepare to walk away. 

 

**take this for what it is, I make my living buying and selling cars and trucks.   My favorite customers are those that are emotionally invested before they get out of their car.    

frenchyd
frenchyd SuperDork
6/13/18 11:20 a.m.

In reply to SLGGR : I’ve bought untitled  cars on bill of sale for parts or race cars.  However some states make it possible to tittle an untitled car.  I bought a Model A ford on a bill of sale from an antique shop and got it registered without a lot hassles. The receipt from a long established business may have eased the way.  

Legitimately tittles do get lost and documentation is your friend. Take pictures of the sellers drivers license ( and seller if he’ll let you)  pay with a check even if he wants cash, just cash the check and have him endorse it.  

Yes nothing is perfect, a friend got a tittle only to have it rejected by the state because while it looked and felt very real it was on the wrong paper.  

Another friend bought some trivial parts at a garage sale and the prior owner identified the parts as his and claimed the whole restored car.  

I’ve heard of difficulties with a rare fuel injection that was sold by a long established shop to a 3rd party.  Wound up in court with big legal bills.  

Luckily  those are the rare exceptions.  

 

ultraclyde
ultraclyde PowerDork
6/13/18 12:20 p.m.
frenchyd said:

In reply to SLGGR : I’ve bought untitled  cars on bill of sale for parts or race cars.  However some states make it possible to tittle an untitled car.  I bought a Model A ford on a bill of sale from an antique shop and got it registered without a lot hassles. The receipt from a long established business may have eased the way.  

Legitimately tittles do get lost and documentation is your friend. Take pictures of the sellers drivers license ( and seller if he’ll let you)  pay with a check even if he wants cash, just cash the check and have him endorse it.  

Yes nothing is perfect, a friend got a tittle only to have it rejected by the state because while it looked and felt very real it was on the wrong paper.  

Another friend bought some trivial parts at a garage sale and the prior owner identified the parts as his and claimed the whole restored car.  

I’ve heard of difficulties with a rare fuel injection that was sold by a long established shop to a 3rd party.  Wound up in court with big legal bills.  

Luckily  those are the rare exceptions.  

 

If you've lost your tittles you have bigger problems than purchasing an old car.

frenchyd
frenchyd SuperDork
6/13/18 12:30 p.m.

In reply to ultraclyde : mind you I tend to buy cars that are 40- 50 plus years old often from relatives of the previous owner since deceased.  

Grandpa may have had the tittle back when he lived on the farm but the 3-4 moves  since the farm to the old folks home it may not have made the trip.  

That or divorces,  family disputes, moves, furniture being sold with paperwork tossed at the last moment?  Dozens of legitimate reasons tittles are gone.  

Someone who flips cars can’t accept that.  Too much hassle.  Understandable, different situations call for different conclusions.  

However if anything seems shady or questionable I agree walk away.  

 

Anthony545
Anthony545 New Reader
6/26/18 5:38 p.m.

I'd also add that if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. And don't let them rush you on making your decision as well. Too many times have I heard, "We've got another potential buyer looking at this on the way." Which may or may not be true but don't let them push you into making a rash decision. 

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