Colin Wood
Colin Wood Associate Editor
8/31/20 2:40 p.m.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/3s9ka42uubU

In theory, just about any engine can be attached to any transmission if you have the right parts. In practice, however, fitting different engines and transmissions can be pretty difficult—as is the case with this '50s Jaguar XK engine fitted to an '80s Chevrolet T5 transmission with a little help from Ford.

Here's a question: What's the oddest engine and transmission combo that you have encountered?

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That's just cool>

frenchyd
frenchyd PowerDork
8/31/20 4:31 p.m.
Colin Wood said:

 

 

In theory, just about any engine can be attached to any transmission if you have the right parts. In practice, however, fitting different engines and transmissions can be pretty difficult—as is the case with this '50s Jaguar XK engine fitted to an '80s Chevrolet T5 transmission with a little help from Ford.

Here's a question: What's the oddest engine and transmission combo that you have encountered?

Watch more videos

There are easy ways and hard ways to do things. Jaguar flywheels are still available both new and used   They bolt right on and don't require any machine work. Yes you will need to ream  out the throw out bearing to take the transmission pilot shaft but that can be done on a simple drill press. ( Use a ream not a drill bit) The last new one I bought cost me $5.00.  
Use the Jaguar pressure plate it already bolts right to the flywheel and just order the clutch disk for the transmission you use. Off the top of my head it's a 10 spine 1&.1/8" ( but please check that)    depending on which transmission you're using  and which engine  you may get lucky and the transmission alignment pins may line up perfectly with the Chevy bell housing  ( mid 1977 and newer) may need a pair of bushings made or some other alignment. 
In some cases I've removed the crankshaft  and made bushings to fit a straight shaft into the main bearings of the engine and transmission. Then using a transfer punch marked alignment points. 
The only thing left at that point is to allow some clearance between the pilot shaft of the transmission  and the crankshaft. You don't want to shove the transmission hard against the crankshaft because that will tear up the thrust bearings and ruin the block. 
It takes me about a morning to fit a Chevy transmission to a Jaguar. 

stuart in mn
stuart in mn MegaDork
8/31/20 5:49 p.m.

He's a young kid, working with what he has.  He started out planning on using a Flathead Ford in his car, then switched to the Jaguar later on, so he already had the T5, clutch and bellhousing parts.  I'd cut him a little slack.

He's building the whole car from scratch with a minimum amount of tools.  If you look at his other videos, he's pretty talented and resourceful.

frenchyd
frenchyd PowerDork
9/1/20 6:29 p.m.

In reply to stuart in mn :

What I like is he's using the little 2.4 What a sweet engine that is .I mean for an engine designed in WW2  and down sized that can be an impressive motor. The head from a 3.8 will bolt right on and provide astonishingly great flow numbers .stock I think it's something like 126 horsepower but I've seen numbers in excess of 350 

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