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markwemple
markwemple UltraDork
12/7/16 10:27 a.m.

The new place won't have 220 in the garage for now so, I'm trying to figure out where to get the biggest 110 unit. Ideas?

kb58
kb58 Dork
12/7/16 10:37 a.m.

Just keep in mind that "hp" ratings on compressors are complete BS. As reference, one horsepower is 746 Watts regardless of voltage. Marketing likes to refer to "peak hp" because it gives a number 1.4 times higher than reality. Just compare how much air they produce and at what pressure.

Anyhow, regarding the biggest, it'll come down to how heavy the 115VAC wiring is and the circuit breaker rating.

kb58
kb58 Dork
12/7/16 10:43 a.m.

Oh, instead of just "largest", think of how it'll fit into your shop. If the largest has a horizontal tank it might be a problem, whereas a vertical setup might fit in better.

bigdaddylee82
bigdaddylee82 SuperDork
12/7/16 11:15 a.m.

Biggest as in tank volume or CFM?

With 110-120VAC you're pretty limited usually to 15 or 20 amp.

If you want a lot of CFM, get 220 ran to the garage. I'd rather pay to do that once, than buy 2 compressors. Depending on what kind of inspections you have to deal with, and assuming room in the breaker box, adding the power you need isn't difficult. I've done it in 2 different rent houses, just don't tell the land lord.

markwemple
markwemple UltraDork
12/7/16 11:18 a.m.

Consistent cfm. So a large tank is important. I'd strongly prefer a vertical tank.

SVreX
SVreX MegaDork
12/7/16 11:56 a.m.

Voltage has to do with motor size.

Air volume has more to do with tank size (at least for a reasonable amount of time).

There is no reason you can't put a small compressor on a very large tank, and run most things. (May have a very long recovery time when the pressure actually does drop)

SVreX
SVreX MegaDork
12/7/16 11:57 a.m.

How consistent is consistent?

Even with big compressors, there is a range through which the pressure and/or volume operates. It's not really consistent, it is consistently within a certain range.

SVreX
SVreX MegaDork
12/7/16 12:01 p.m.

I have a mobile vendor who was convinced he needed a gigantic air compressor to run his 8 or 10 nail guns at once. He dragged around an enormous 220V vertical tank compressor in a trailer, but never had adequate electric supply at the job sites.

He burned up the motor.

I attached my small portable 110V pancake compressor inline to his big air tank. Ran 10 guns all week.

Crackers
Crackers Reader
12/7/16 12:11 p.m.

A larger 110v unit may still need improved wiring in your workspace. Garages generally aren't wired very heavily. Even at that, I haven't really seen modern 110v units that put out more than about 5-6 cfm @ 90 psi anyhow which really limits the number of tools capable of running continuously.

Short of about 10 cfm continuous the only thing I really use a compressor for is airing tires and painting.

codrus
codrus SuperDork
12/7/16 12:16 p.m.
SVreX wrote: I have a mobile vendor who was convinced he needed a gigantic air compressor to run his 8 or 10 nail guns at once. He dragged around an enormous 220V vertical tank compressor in a trailer, but never had adequate electric supply at the job sites. He burned up the motor. I attached my small portable 110V pancake compressor inline to his big air tank. Ran 10 guns all week.

Yeah, nail guns take very little air. One grinder, OTOH, will outpace almost any 110v compressor out there.

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
12/7/16 12:21 p.m.

+1 for 220V to the garage. That way you can install an EV charger in the future too, which is good for the property value.

SVreX
SVreX MegaDork
12/7/16 1:06 p.m.

In reply to codrus:

Framing nail guns take quite a bit. (though not as much as a grinder). A framing nailer is typically 3-4 cfm, a grinder is typically 4-7 cfm.

10 framing nailers need about 40 cfm steady at a minimum of 90 psi or more (not considering 400' of leaking hoses)

BrokenYugo
BrokenYugo UltimaDork
12/7/16 1:43 p.m.

If the garage has no sub panel, I wouldn't go over 4-5 amps short of the breaker (15 or 20 amps), otherwise you'll be popping it constantly trying to run the compressor and lights and whatnot.

Avoid the oilless units like they'll give you HIV.

rslifkin
rslifkin Dork
12/7/16 2:01 p.m.
SVreX wrote: In reply to codrus: Framing nail guns take quite a bit. (though not as much as a grinder). A framing nailer is typically 3-4 cfm, a grinder is typically 4-7 cfm. 10 framing nailers need about 40 cfm steady at a minimum of 90 psi or more (not considering 400' of leaking hoses)

A nailer doesn't take nearly as much air as the specs would indicate. Yes, it draws a significant bit while it's firing. But it's not being fired continuously, so even if it's a burst every couple of seconds, it's still a lot less than 3 - 4 cfm of actual average draw.

Impact guns are similar in the sense of short bursts of high draw. They only draw a lot of air when you're wailing on a badly stuck bolt. I've pulled lug nuts with an impact using a pancake compressor with a 3.5 gallon tank. The compressor kicked on to re-fill while I was removing the 5th lug (and was recharged before I got to the next wheel).

collinskl1
collinskl1 New Reader
12/7/16 2:07 p.m.

I have a 40 foot long extension cord that I use for my compressor and welder. It's as big around as a quarter (I forget the gauge) and I plug it into my dryer receptacle. At my last place, that was in the basement. Now it's just around the corner, inside the house.

Vigo
Vigo PowerDork
12/7/16 3:01 p.m.

When i had to run 220v wiring in the garage for my compressor, it was really easy other than the part where i snapped a drill bit and simultaneously stabbed the remnant through most of my finger and cracked a nail.. from the bottom side.

But i didnt hit anything important so i finished the job and enjoyed the hell out of that big compressor (60gal for me).

I agree that HP numbers are useless for the 110 compressor. 110 X your circuit breaker amps is your Watts (easily converted to HP) which, minus a fudge factor for nothing ever being perfect, is all you could ever get and you'll notice many compressor are advertised HIGHER in clear violation of Watt's Law. There's a lot more resolution in 220-240v hp ratings since they could potentially mean something. Mine is a 3hp which is actually 'small' for a 220v compressor. CFM is a lot easier to compare with regardless of voltage.

BrokenYugo
BrokenYugo UltimaDork
12/7/16 3:03 p.m.

In reply to collinskl1:

Good idea, monster extension cord for a welder/RV off the dryer or stove outlet (will probably need an adapter pigtail if you buy the cord) will get you at least 30 amps of 240. I've done some welding with a setup like that, worked fine.

imgon
imgon Reader
12/7/16 3:04 p.m.

+1 on running a 240 volt circuit out to the garage. Even a 20A 120v circuit is only good for 16A. Say your compressor only draws 12A and you have 3 amps of lights you have maxed out the circuit. Depending on how the garage was wired it is a possibility that lights and other stuff are on that circuit and every time the compressor kicks in it could trip your circuit. A 240 circuit will allow you to use a bigger motor with less amperage draw saving a little bit on your electric bill.

SVreX
SVreX MegaDork
12/7/16 3:16 p.m.

In reply to rslifkin:

I think you missed the part about 10 of them and leaky hoses, but OK, you win.

Still completely missed the point. The point was we used a big tank and a small 110V compressor, and it accomplished vastly more. That 110V compressor was incapable of driving a single framing nailer (regardless of what they actually draw), but perfectly capable of driving 10 of them full speed with a big tank inline for over a week.

220V electric is a far better idea, but there are other options (depending on usage, which has not been defined by the OP)

Kramer
Kramer Dork
12/7/16 3:18 p.m.

I have a 5 horse 20 gallon. I plumbed steel pipe into a manifold to run additional couplers. Couldn't do big jobs with my conventional spray gun, and had to wait for the compressor to catch up with my air grinders, but it did most of my jobs.

markwemple
markwemple UltraDork
12/7/16 3:32 p.m.

An old 2 stage would be great but I don't know of any 110. I've found my 20 gal inadequate. I'd like enough volume to run a blasting cabinet.

codrus
codrus SuperDork
12/7/16 3:46 p.m.
SVreX wrote: In reply to rslifkin: I think you missed the part about 10 of them and leaky hoses, but OK, you win.

I think it also depends on the skill of the person using the nailer. I'm a newbie at it, so I'm very careful to position it before each pull of the trigger, I'm lucky to get one nail per 5-10 second period. Pros, OTOH, are basically bouncing the nailer off the work pieces. :)

Grinders are just brutal. I have a "2 horsepower", 6.5 scfm compressor (110v) with a 33 gallon tank, and it'll only run my grinder for about 45 seconds before the speed/torque drops to the point that I need to stop and let it recharge. I really need to get a better compressor...

kb58
kb58 Dork
12/7/16 4:30 p.m.

Somewhat related, the way cordless stuff is improving, it's starting to venture into what was once air-tool domain. Just sayin that not long from now air tools may not be a player in the home garage. I'm of course leaving out the crazy tools that need hurricane-size air sources.

oldopelguy
oldopelguy UltraDork
12/7/16 5:51 p.m.

Where is the circuit box? I ask because the compressor could sit next to it and you can run a big hose to where you are working just as easily as a big wire for 220, except without the electrical inspection. Obviously that may not be practical in a bedroom closet, but if the panel is in a basement or utility room it's an option.

impulsive
impulsive Reader
12/7/16 8:25 p.m.
I haven't really seen modern 110v units that put out more than about 5-6 cfm @ 90 psi anyhow which really limits the number of tools capable of running continuously.

There are a few identical "portable" vertical 26gal dual voltage compressors on the market with 7.1cfm rating. Sold under Quincy, Chicago Pneumatic & BelAire brands, possibly others. Mostly made in USA.

I have the BelAire as it was cheapest of the choices at that time.

http://www.belairecompressors.com/p_piston-1stage-electric.html

http://www.quincycompressor.com/products/reciprocating-piston/single-stage/

http://www.cp.com/usen/whatwedo/us-stationarycompressors/pistoncompressors/singlestageelectric.aspx

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