OSULemon
OSULemon Reader
12/15/13 12:32 p.m.

Budget is approximate. I have an admittedly low amount of knowledge when it comes to classic/vintage trucks. I like the look of 60's F100's, and those seem to be relatively affordable for cleaner examples.

http://tulsa.craigslist.org/cto/4133841301.html

I don't really have the time or the resources to do a restore/restomod on a truck, so I'm looking for turn-key examples. Hopefully one day, my parents will move closer and I can have a father/son project.

What generation should I be looking at if I want to be able to use the truck to haul trailers, motorcycles, etc if need be? I don't mind lower MPG. I'm not road tripping very often. Maybe I'd need to pull the Miata. Stuff like that.

My grandpa has a 1970's F250 that I like the look of. I haven't decided if I like the swoopier lines of '50's trucks and stepsides, or the boxy, no-nonsense shape. I do know that I'd prefer a manual on the floor, but that's less important.

I'm going to peruse through the HAMB forums and see what I can find. I think I might get matching Vintage Truck magazines for my Dad and me this Christmas. I'm a big fan of clean, stock trucks. Not so big on the bagged, chrome, etc. Looks like they focus on the former.

irish44j
irish44j UberDork
12/15/13 12:40 p.m.

I have interest in this subject as well. I have no reason to own a $$$ pickup truck, but the thought of buying a vintage truck to do a light restore on and use for utility work has been in the back of my head for a while.....and one that is immune from emissions/safety inspections :)

Ditchdigger
Ditchdigger SuperDork
12/15/13 12:46 p.m.

A ford unibody is one of my two current automotive crushes

OSULemon
OSULemon Reader
12/15/13 12:52 p.m.
irish44j wrote: I have interest in this subject as well. I have no reason to own a $$$ pickup truck, but the thought of buying a vintage truck to do a light restore on and use for utility work has been in the back of my head for a while.....and one that is immune from emissions/safety inspections :)

It's also partly a desire to be different. Dropping 15-20k on a nice 5 year old truck doesn't really separate you from anybody in the lower Midwest.

fasted58
fasted58 PowerDork
12/15/13 1:04 p.m.

Always liked the mid-60's to '72 Chevy SWB step sides, still wanna restore/ own one.

mad_machine
mad_machine MegaDork
12/15/13 1:25 p.m.

I keep having this urge to get a 1963 truck and paint it like my boat (dark green/tan) for use in towing my sailboat around

SnowMongoose
SnowMongoose HalfDork
12/15/13 1:28 p.m.

Billy_Bottle_Caps
Billy_Bottle_Caps HalfDork
12/15/13 1:38 p.m.

In reply to SnowMongoose:

^^ hell yeah love that truck

irish44j
irish44j UberDork
12/15/13 1:59 p.m.
SnowMongoose wrote:

reminds me of that miata shot with the guy holding the steering wheel outside of the car...

stuart in mn
stuart in mn PowerDork
12/15/13 2:23 p.m.

If you like Fords, 1965 - 1979 Twin I-Beam trucks are basically the same under the body. Newer ones had disk brakes, power steering and other improvements but had the same basic design; you can easily upgrade the earlier trucks with parts from the newer ones.

bmw88rider
bmw88rider Reader
12/15/13 2:40 p.m.

Older dodges are cool too. If you want to have a pretty stout truck then j series jeeps and do an early wagoneer conversion.

I would do a camper special f100 though. 390 versions drive decent.

bearmtnmartin
bearmtnmartin HalfDork
12/15/13 2:40 p.m.

How about a Blazer or a Bronco? I had a 1972 Blazer and it was a really good daily driver. I still have my 1970 f100 4x4 and that is a really good truck as well. But the Blazer was more comfortable and had discs and power steering along with a few other options that really made it a more enjoyable truck to drive. My feeling is that unless it behaves more or less like a newer vehicle you will not keep it as a daily driver for long. Maybe that is why the 1967-1972 Chevys are worth so much more than the Fords. Chevrolet recognized earlier that people wanted trucks that were as nice to drive as the cars were.

OSULemon
OSULemon Reader
12/15/13 3:27 p.m.
bearmtnmartin wrote: How about a Blazer or a Bronco? I had a 1972 Blazer and it was a really good daily driver. I still have my 1970 f100 4x4 and that is a really good truck as well. But the Blazer was more comfortable and had discs and power steering along with a few other options that really made it a more enjoyable truck to drive. My feeling is that unless it behaves more or less like a newer vehicle you will not keep it as a daily driver for long. Maybe that is why the 1967-1972 Chevys are worth so much more than the Fords. Chevrolet recognized earlier that people wanted trucks that were as nice to drive as the cars were.

Those aren't doing it for me as much. I appreciate the old Bronco's, but unfortunately, the worst roommate I ever had in college drove a purple one. Might've ruined it for me.

ebonyandivory
ebonyandivory Dork
12/15/13 3:40 p.m.

[URL=http://s265.photobucket.com/user/derekrichardson/media/DSCN0247.jpg.html][/URL]

Junkyard_Dog
Junkyard_Dog Dork
12/15/13 3:48 p.m.
ebonyandivory wrote: [URL=http://s265.photobucket.com/user/derekrichardson/media/DSCN0247.jpg.html][/URL]

While I personally wouldn't consider the above truck vintage, it does bring up an interesting point. You could buy a nice '96 and retrofit an '80 front end, add trim and two-tone, and end up with this:

I really don't consider a 1980 vintage either, but you could have a relatively modern truck with much older styling for not much money.

oldopelguy
oldopelguy SuperDork
12/15/13 3:53 p.m.

Prior to the mid 60's you are going to get generators instead of alternators, points, manual brakes and steering, drum brakes, straight front axles, and minimalist HVAC.

By the mid 70's electronic ignition, power disc brakes, power steering, ac, suspensions, quality charging systems, audio systems, and seats had improved to be technology not far off now. We lament the good old simplicity of the old trucks, then and mustang 2, nova, or Dakota front suspension, stereos, and engine upgrades to make it not simple anymore.

So, in short, if you just want a driver and are not willing, able, or wanting to go through everything, here's my recommendations: -67-72 Chevy/GMC: great looks, decent suspension, huge bolt on aftermarket support. Buy last couple of years for brakes.

-73-87 Chevy/GMC: essentially a modern truck if you get 2wd. Buy nicest condition you can get.

-68?-73 Ford: very rugged truck, buy on condition.

-74-78 Ford: same as older ones, you either like or don't the body style.

-72-93 Dodge: '81 body restyle is purely cosmetic. Buy older for carbed models, or buy newer for efi and overdrive transmission. '78 last of the big block, 86 last of the slant 6. Avoid anything with a computer in the air filter housing unless it is pristine.

Every truck older you are buying for looks. That's not bad if you are ok with actually doing maintenance and opening the hood when you get gas and all, just don't expect it to be reliable like a modern car without a lot of work.

One more option worth looking into is a cab swap. Depending on your local laws, your skills, and your goals for the truck, a $10k budget will buy a nice late '90s or early '00s pickup with plenty to spare for a non-running earlier body style you like. Depending on where you live, probably even leaving enough left over for a paint job. Add up ifs, disk brakes, overdrive and fuel injection in aftermarket parts and you will spend more than a 2000 Silverado or f150 goes for.

turbojunker
turbojunker HalfDork
12/15/13 3:57 p.m.
irish44j wrote:
SnowMongoose wrote:
reminds me of that miata shot with the guy holding the steering wheel outside of the car...

Yeah those two dudes that work for Hot Rod are real posers

patgizz
patgizz UberDork
12/15/13 4:06 p.m.

i never got the whole "let's remove the outside mirrors and leave holes" look. PPO did that to my 68, luckily the mirrors came with.

mine is going to be backwards from that one. the truck is original faded orange, and my new stepside bed is original faded powder blue. the more i look at things, the more i wish to lower it.

Dusterbd13
Dusterbd13 Dork
12/15/13 4:57 p.m.

Honestly, also look at el caminos. For everything you listed, short of towing the miata (I'm assuming enclosed of steel full on trailer with gear for a track weekend) it would fit the bill, drive very car like, and retain value. Huge aftermarket support for everything but trim and sheettmetal (on the earlier ones). Id look from 68-76 for the chevelle based ones, with good options and workability. You can find DAMN nice 71-72 trucks for 10k.

JFX001
JFX001 UltraDork
12/15/13 7:24 p.m.

Gladiator:

http://austin.craigslist.org./cto/4245134517.html

(NMNA)

ddavidv
ddavidv PowerDork
12/16/13 5:26 a.m.

I have no idea what you are talking about.

Here's a few pages of info I wrote about the 61-66 F series trucks: ddavidv's Slick 60s pages The easiest old trucks to get parts for are Chevys, but Fords are a pretty close second. Dodges can be a real challenge, as can anything weirder than that (IH, Jeep). Ford changed from solid front axle and leaf springs in 65 to the Twin I setup and that is the same basic truck underneath up through '79. Sites such as Slick 60s and Fordification can tell you all you'd ever want to know about them.

The only thing to really worry about on these old trucks is rust; they had zero galvanizing or rust proofing and they evaporate like a Pinto living at the seashore. Prices can be all over the place, but decent trucks needing nothing can be found pretty easily under 10 grand with driver quality ones at half that. Just be educated on the rust issues and where to look.

tuna55
tuna55 PowerDork
12/16/13 7:14 a.m.
ddavidv wrote: The only thing to really worry about on these old trucks is rust; they had zero galvanizing or rust proofing and they evaporate like a Pinto living at the seashore. Prices can be all over the place, but decent trucks needing nothing can be found pretty easily under 10 grand with driver quality ones at half that. Just be educated on the rust issues and where to look.

Yes this. Bring a magnet. Otherwise you'll end up like me:

http://grassrootsmotorsports.com/forum/build-projects-and-project-cars/build-thread-for-the-72-gmc-finally-thanks-john/59103/page36/

As you can see, I also liked the 67-72 GM option. Get a coil spring rear end and a later one with disc brakes, everything else is easy-peasy.

RossD
RossD PowerDork
12/16/13 7:22 a.m.

Also, don't let driving a modern late model truck trick you. Driving a reciprocating ball steering box truck through traffic is like navigating a barge down a tributary. Factor in loose rubber bushings... and it becomes even more so.

Even my dad's 1990 Suburban has this feel compared to newer rack and pinion trucks.

But it doesn't keep me from wanting a '70s stepside short box single cab Ford.

jstancel
jstancel Reader
12/16/13 9:13 p.m.

My suggestion would be a Chevy. Buying a long bed will save you money. Long beds are the equivalent of a 4 door classic car.

bmw88rider
bmw88rider Reader
12/17/13 6:40 a.m.

Damn you JFX. I really like that Gladiator. Thank goodness I just got a new project otherwise I could see myself in that truck. It looks nice.

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