1 2 3 4
mazdeuce - Seth
mazdeuce - Seth Mod Squad
2/5/20 6:33 a.m.

What do you think of the casting/build quality of the engine and bike in general? 

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/5/20 7:03 a.m.
mazdeuce - Seth said:

What do you think of the casting/build quality of the engine and bike in general? 

This bike seems as good as any Honda I have ever worked on. That's a lot of Hondas by the way. Everything is sturdy, clever, and the component quality is exceptional.

I was telling my wife the other day, I started working as an auto mechanic part time in 1988 and then full time in 1991, when I finished high school. I initially shied away from anything that wasn't American made. Then as I worked on more imports, I found Honda to stand above the rest with quality. Often something looked unorthodox or unduly difficult, but when it was all over I would see the logic behind it and I came to realize Honda engineers are always clever and it was always simpler and easier than American cars. 

In the last 30 years I've almost developed an irrational infatuation with Honda. I just won't hear of anything that says they aren't the best.

Well, except for Odyssey transmissions. We all know they goofed that one up..

Dr. Hess
Dr. Hess MegaDork
2/5/20 8:20 a.m.

My friend with the tire machine bought it when he realized that bike tires just don't last, and the dealer charges like a hundred dollars labor and an extra hundred for the tire.  So he bought his own tire machine.  Then, he was leaving on a trip the next day and didn't have time to do the tire himself, so he had the dealer do it for him.  Front tire on a Harley dresser.  He picked up the bike and was riding home and a front caliper fell off.  The "mechanic" didn't tighten the bolts.  He went down to the dealer wanting "to see the mechanic that did this so I can beat him senseless for almost killing me" or something to that effect, they calmed him down, and fired the "mechanic."  He was known in the shop for doing work very fast, but cutting corners.  Pretty sure my friend only does his own from that point on.

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/5/20 10:33 a.m.

I used to have one of those Harbor Freight manual tire machines. It was always kind of in the way. As you know, you've got to secure it down some way, whether with bolts or a lot of weight. I had mine lag screwed to the floor of my storage shed. I might should consider revisiting getting another one. As I get older and my back gets worse, working on boards on the floor does lose it's appeal. 

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/6/20 3:19 p.m.

Today I was hoping to install my new wheels bearings but it didn't pan out. They are at my local Post Office but they aren't due delivery until tomorrow and I guess the delivery person didn't want to deliver them ahead of schedule.

One challenge that these bikes present is the spacer in the center of the wheel fits so snugly that you can't budge it out of the way to get a purchase point to punch the old bearings out. So, to get the first bearing out you're faced with a blind bearing pull scenario.

The internet is full of homemade tool ideas to do this, rental tools down at the FLAPS, etc. But I couldn't get up the energy to go spend money or hassle with renting a tool.

The challenge...

A 6 mm bolt, nut, and washer...

Drop it down into the center bore of the bearing...

Weld into the middle of the bearing race (or offset like I somehow managed to do here). Then flip the wheel over and you now have an easy job of putting a long drift down through the center of the wheel and knocking that blind bearing out.

You can see the three bosses in the center of the hub that keep the bearing spacer from being able to be moved aside even a little bit.

I don't want to install my tires onto the wheels until I have pressed the new bearings into place. I don't care to wrestle anymore weight than necessary.

I know that this isn't necessarily edge-of-the-seat riveting progress here, but, you can't build something without a lot of little mundane steps along the way.

 

wheelsmithy
wheelsmithy UltraDork
2/6/20 5:01 p.m.
Cousin_Eddie said:

I know that this isn't necessarily edge-of-the-seat riveting progress here, but, you can't build something without a lot of little mundane steps along the way.

 

Nonsense, your near obsessive attention to detail is truly entertaining to watch.

I'm sure I'm ont the only one to look at a thread of yours, and think "I've got to up my game".

Carry on.

AngryCorvair
AngryCorvair MegaDork
2/6/20 6:14 p.m.
wheelsmithy said:
Cousin_Eddie said:

I know that this isn't necessarily edge-of-the-seat riveting progress here, but, you can't build something without a lot of little mundane steps along the way.

 

Nonsense, your near obsessive attention to detail is truly entertaining to watch.

I'm sure I'm ont the only one to look at a thread of yours, and think "I've got to up my game".

Carry on.

Every. Dang. Time.

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/7/20 8:15 p.m.

Today was a little demotivating. 

First, my bearings and seals arrived.

So I pressed everything together. No problems so far.

Then I spooned the new tire in place and dropped 2oz of Dynabeads into the tire for balance. At this point things are still progressing swimmingly.

Then I sat down and started to evaluate the rear brakes. I knew up front that I'd want to sift through the braking system as needed to get it all up to spec. And that's when I see that some cretin has taken his Channellocks to the caliper pistons sometime in the past.

At that point my day kind of took a turn. So I just removed it all an blew it apart. Several eBay orders placed. Many new parts to be delivered in the future. 

I was telling my wife that stuff like this is frustrating because you plan for hopefully a pad replacement and maybe a caliper overhaul. But you wind up having to redo everything from soup-to-nuts. Every time something like this happens it costs another week or so waiting on parts. Nevertheless, I shall persevere. 

 

 

 

Mr_Asa
Mr_Asa Reader
2/7/20 8:31 p.m.

Where does the seal sit in those calipers?  Is it at all possible to smooth the boogered bits up?

OHSCrifle
OHSCrifle SuperDork
2/8/20 8:50 a.m.

This thread reinforces the thought that there is nobody I'd rather buy a used vehicle from than Cousin_Eddie. 
 

Thanks for documenting the process like so many times before. The YouTube algorithm has got nothing on GRM message board. 

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/8/20 10:57 a.m.
Mr_Asa said:

Where does the seal sit in those calipers?  Is it at all possible to smooth the boogered bits up?

I've been measuring that. It looks like the damage will fall within the seal's sweep. I found new pistons available if I need to get one. I may wait until my new brake pads arrive and, using them and their increased thickness, reevaluate where the piston sits in operation. This is a stupid heavy bike, I will err on the side of caution however I proceed.

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/8/20 11:08 a.m.
OHSCrifle said:

This thread reinforces the thought that there is nobody I'd rather buy a used vehicle from than Cousin_Eddie. 
 

 

I saw a meme the other day that reminds me of my project builds.

 

zilla916
zilla916 New Reader
2/8/20 7:45 p.m.

In reply to 914Driver :

Timing belts aren't that bad on the 1100/1200. I'd have to look, but a Subaru belt works and is MUCH cheaper than OEM Honda. 

zilla916
zilla916 New Reader
2/8/20 7:52 p.m.

In reply to Cousin_Eddie : Subaru. Can't remember the model though.

 

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/8/20 8:33 p.m.
zilla916 said:

In reply to 914Driver :

Timing belts aren't that bad on the 1100/1200. I'd have to look, but a Subaru belt works and is MUCH cheaper than OEM Honda. 

I did the timing belts first thing. Back on the first page, along with resealing the front of the engine, water pump, and cooling system refresh. I got them from Rockauto. So far everything on this bike has been dead easy. The old codgers that hang out at the Goldwing forum boards make out like it's rocket surgery to work on these things. 

zilla916
zilla916 New Reader
2/9/20 5:13 p.m.

In reply to Cousin_Eddie :

I'd rather work on my 1200 than my 1800. 

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/9/20 5:46 p.m.

Not much to update today. Many parts ordered and I have to go to work for 48 hours starting tomorrow morning. 

I did remove a ton of complexity from the bike today though. I didn't take any pictures. I removed the old antique radio system, amplifier, display, antennae, everything. And I removed the automatic air ride stuff. I'm converting the bike to manual air ride like the lower spec (Interstate) Goldwings used.  It just uses a schrader valve front and rear and doesn't have the control panel, air compressor, air dryer, and all the connecting lines. All of that stuff is a real mess. Like a milk crate full going into the dumpster in the morning. 

trumant
trumant New Reader
2/9/20 7:16 p.m.

Didn't realize these ran air shocks. Rear only or on both ends?

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/9/20 7:43 p.m.
trumant said:

Didn't realize these ran air shocks. Rear only or on both ends?

Front and rear, both on separate circuits. On the high spec bikes like mine, there is a control panel with gauges and pressure switches so the rider and tune air pressure front and rear on the fly. The center trunk is taken up by the air compressor and dryer and all it's plumbing. The lower spec bikes used schrader valves front and rear so the rider can manually set the pressures. I did away with all the fancy stuff to open up the center trunk for proper storage space. I also removed about 6 feet of air lines in the process along with the compressor and stuff.

Zachary
Zachary New Reader
2/9/20 7:54 p.m.

I had an 82' Interstate named Taterstein for quite a while. It was quite quick, comfortable, functional, and had shockingly good handling considering what it was and when it was made. The site Naked Goldwings has some really neat projects on it if you haven't found it yet, but I kept mine stock and aside from rebuilding the carbs, I enjoyed it very much. I mostly just wanted to comment and commend you for the build threads you add here. The detail you put into the builds and write ups are amazing and very entertaining to read. Thank you!

stuart in mn
stuart in mn MegaDork
2/9/20 7:58 p.m.

That air compressor sounds like it could be repurposed for filling up low tires - maybe throw it in the trunk of your car instead of in the trash.  There may be Gold Wing owners somewhere who are looking for stereo components as well.

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/10/20 5:08 a.m.

The used market is absolutely lousy with so many old Wings being parted out. Stereos and air suspension stuff is everywhere and no one wants to buy it. I'm not one to hassle with old parts that might bring enough money to buy a sandwich. Into the dumpster they go.

I took some pictures this morning to show some details. Sorry they are so lousy, they were taken by dome light in my Landcruiser seconds before they found their new home in the dumpster.

Here is the control dash (switches already removed). It mounts to the top of the fake gas tank in front of the rider. Also shown is the air dryer and a couple of hoses.

Here is the little compressor. It really reminds me of a model airplane engine. 

Hand to show scale.

And here is the pile of stereo stuff. It uses an irregular size control head, an amplifier and tuner box. And miles upon miles of cables and wire. Two big bulky speaker. Tall antenna. 

Sorry for the poor pictures. Maybe I should consider LED dome light bulbs for the Landcruiser.  And no snarky comments on my throw rug. It protects the factory carpet back there. I'm always hauling something sketchy.

Cousin_Eddie
Cousin_Eddie HalfDork
2/12/20 3:20 p.m.

While I was away at work a couple of needed packages arrived. I had to order the two o-rings that seal the final drive splines. There is one inside of the wheel hub and another on the driveshaft housing. 

I also had to order some special spline lube. Spline lubing is a war of biblical proportions on most motorcycle forum boards. The take away is that Honda 60% Moly lube is the proper product to use. Unfortunately Honda quit making that formulation awhile back. But, fortunately I found a 70% Moly content product. The price was quite dear for a bottle delivered to my mailbox.

I lubed all splines with the Moly and all o-rings with Honda Shin-Etsu grease. All factory service manual prescribed procedures down to the letter.

Reinstalling the rear wheel is quite a hassle. The axle bolt doesn't clear the exhaust so you have to forcefully elevate the rear swingarm enough to give the through bolt a straight shot. In the end, all is complete.

Careful observation will show the rear brake hose is just hanging there. That's phase two of the rear wheel project. I have ordered what should be quite a decent ultrasonic cleaner which is due delivery Friday. I'm hoping the ultrasonic will take my work to a little higher level. I'm saving the brake parts until it gets here and use them as the first project with the new cleaner.

 

Mr_Asa
Mr_Asa Reader
2/12/20 4:22 p.m.

"a little higher level"

Criminy.

ebelements
ebelements Reader
2/12/20 4:43 p.m.

I have always secretly wanted a goldwing, so watching this vintage model come together is a guilty pleasure.

Had to google dynabeads. They appear to be synthesized from some sort of dark magic. Have you used them before?

That loctite moly paste you bought for the rear splines is the same stuff the FJR guys recommend as well.  With how infrequently it's needed I feel like I'll be passing this little bottle down to the kids I'm not planning on having.

1 2 3 4
Our Preferred Partners
jPru5keaajkgghIVxzBYsaSw2ogrPNL8TJXO5h47L7q1cApLmSODJRWcKuYJZ2Da