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MazdaFace
MazdaFace Dork
7/25/18 9:27 a.m.

In reply to Ian F :

Went ahead and listed it on pinkbike. Hopefully it sells. Going to replace it with a Salsa Journeyman 650 claris (with the drop bars of course)

coexist
coexist Reader
7/25/18 10:18 a.m.

After considering quite a few bikes, my daughter recently got a Journeyman 650 Sora drop bar. Loves it. 

 

coexist
coexist Reader
7/25/18 10:21 a.m.

Couple more of mine.

GameboyRMH
GameboyRMH MegaDork
7/25/18 11:45 a.m.

So after being out of cycling for probably close to a decade, an MTB caught my eye at Canadian Tire while I was on vacation. On special for $320CAD down from $525. It had suspension and disc brakes on both ends, 21-speed trans, aluminum frame, non-hokey brand. Seemed like a decent deal, a nice upgrade from my old Raleigh hardtail that I gave to a homeless guy (who later thanked me by stealing some of my stuff). Then I looked it up online and the price said $270!?

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/ccm-sl-2-0-dual-suspension-mountain-bike-26-in-0711156p.html

I asked if that deal was available in the store and it was! So I bought one. Great deal although I may soon regret it for budgetary reasons.

Next of course I immediately set out to slap some mods on it. So far I've done:

- Diamondback alloy pedals with clips...just because it was a fast and easy way to get clips. May have to put the clips on the stock plastic pedals as these are tearing each shoe a new shiny happy person.

- Cheapo drink holder

- Everyday clip-on HV/HP pump with gauge.

- Cheapo mud guard

- Bell USB-charged LED headlight (super light!)

- Bell AA-powered LED taillight (heavy AF!)

- Bell cable lock

- Cheapo rear derailleur guard (also quite heavy!)

Next mod I'm considering is a suspension seat suited to the larger gentleman, because the stock one is small and hard. I rode some trails in Oshawa and Newmarket with it before leaving it with my grandmother, maybe I'll make an adventure section thread.

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
7/25/18 11:59 a.m.

My latest acquisition. Santa Cruz Chameleon. I still have some parts to buy, so it'll probably be a few weeks before I can get it built up.

USERNAMETAKEN
USERNAMETAKEN Reader
7/25/18 2:41 p.m.

In reply to Furious_E :

I like that Diamondback for several reasons.  It looks like a truly modern trail bike.  Short stem, long low front end.  Big 27.5 tires.  Single-chainring drivetrain.  Front 15mm thru-axle.  You're hitting all the high-points right off the bat.  And those are all things you can't really upgrade - they're either there or they're not.

Then you could upgrade the weak spots over time.  Add a dropper post for more flexibility.  Spring for some hydraulic discs if you desire.

The only thing that you can't change is the 9mm quick release axle, but I'd argue that's not as big a deal on a hard-tail.

I say buy it and shred!

Ashyukun (Robert)
Ashyukun (Robert) UltraDork
7/25/18 2:42 p.m.

Can't take a picture and post it at the moment since both myself and the bike are sitting in a secured office where picture-taking is verboten (and theoretically I'm one of the ones who is supposed to enforce that), but my long-serving commuter bike is a 1987 Fuji Del Rey. Mine still has its original paint job, so it looks almost identical to the bike shown in that link at least frame-wise. Though in practical terms, the frame, the handlebars, the brake levers and the down-tube shifters are likely the only truly original parts on it now.

I bought it about 16-17 years ago at a yard sale for $30. The drivetrain was shot and the front wheel was bend, and it cost about 6x what I initially paid for it to get it back on the road. It's since had pretty much every moving part replaced at least once and has carried me back and forth commuting both back in CT where I was living when I bought it and here in Lexington. I ended up having to ride it from Bridgeport, CT to Stamford, CT on the night of the Great New England Blackout because the trains I usually took from near my office in Bridgeport to home in Stamford were obviously not running because of the power being out, turning what was usually about 2 1/2 miles of riding into about 25 (and getting a flat along the way but thankfully near a bike shop that the staff hadn't closed).

As long as I don't get into a major accident and destroy the frame, the bike will probably be useable far beyond my ability to ride it...

MazdaFace
MazdaFace Dork
7/25/18 5:16 p.m.

In reply to coexist :

What size did she get? And how tall is she? There are basically zero salsa dealers near me that stock this bike so I'm on the fence between a 52cm or a 54cm. My road bike and single speed are both 52cm, but my previous road bike was a 54. Looking at the geometry on the salsa, a lot of the specs for the 54cm salsa look an awful lot like the specs on my 52cm pure fix.  I'm 5'8 for what it's worth.

Ransom
Ransom PowerDork
7/25/18 5:28 p.m.

In reply to Ashyukun (Robert) :

Nice! My first "bike shop bike" was a Fuji Espree. Got it new in '86, IIRC... I recall it being slightly more clearly green than the available '85 pic. My uncle worked at a shop that sold Fujis; I had the hots for the Sagres (I think) and the Club Fuji, but both were way out of my range.

T.J.
T.J. MegaDork
7/25/18 5:50 p.m.

Here is my cross bike. Bought some 700x28 tires for it to use in place of the 700x35 knobbies that are on it now to do some road riding for fitness/weight loss. 

BoxheadTim
BoxheadTim MegaDork
7/25/18 6:59 p.m.

Any opinions on Proflex 856s? I've been keeping an eye out for a cheapo MTB that's not a complete disaster. I've read up on them a bit and it sound like the rear swingarm can crack but couldn't find much else.

Are those worth a gamble at 200-ish before haggling?

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
7/25/18 7:50 p.m.

In reply to BoxheadTim :

It depends some on the shock.  They originally used an elastomer shock that doesn't age well and is essentially unobtanium today.  Later versions switched to a coil shock that was a bit more reliable.  The top end model "The Animal" came with Noleen active shocks and very good Magura hydraulic rim brakes.  I might pay $200 for one of those, but an older one would need to be damn near perfect. 

Ransom
Ransom PowerDork
7/25/18 8:22 p.m.

The last two-wheeled member of the Ransom collection... A Sunday Model C which I've failed to ride much, but still hope to. I got it from Burrito, in keeping with the GRM flow of my BMXey bikes, after trading a trials bike to DILYSIDave for a Hutch Exel, which I assembled and which then promptly reminded me that vintage BMX bikes are old. I really kinda want a street trials bike, and the Sunday has short stays and a tall bottom bracket, but it's still a BMX bike, with 990 brakes on the rear (foo, I hate), no front brake provision outside a hole where I could mount sidepulls or a 990 plate, and it weighs enough to take big BMX landings I'm never going to give it. That said, I need to take it over to the Lumberyard and work on some basics... It's right here in my basement and I could be learning stuff.

BoxheadTim
BoxheadTim MegaDork
7/25/18 8:25 p.m.

In reply to Ian F :

Thanks Ian - assuming we're talking about the rear shock, then yes, it does have the elastomer shock. There's another one for sale with the newer generation shock, but that looks like it was used rather, err, well.

USERNAMETAKEN
USERNAMETAKEN Reader
7/25/18 8:30 p.m.
BoxheadTim said:

Any opinions on Proflex 856s? I've been keeping an eye out for a cheapo MTB that's not a complete disaster. I've read up on them a bit and it sound like the rear swingarm can crack but couldn't find much else.

Are those worth a gamble at 200-ish before haggling?

Well, I guess that would depend on your reason for buying it.  If you want to buy it to collect a classic old mtb that is unique and was well regarded at the time, then probably $200 would be reasonable for a very nice example.

If you want a bike for riding, then I think you could do better.  I was a huge mtb guy in the 90's and love all the silly stuff from then, but today's bikes are just so much better.  There's nothing that old Proflex will do better than a modern bike.  The Diamondback discussed above is a MUCH nicer bike.

Here's my foray into classic mtb purchases:

When I was in college and poor I lusted after these Trek 8300's.  Carbon frame with aluminum lugs.  Splatter paint.  What wasn't to like?!

I found this one on CL for $180, with the crazy Spin wheels and the Magura hydraulic brakes.  Awesomeness...

Bought it, fixed it up, rode it.  Turned out the frame was uncomfortably stretched out, the Spin wheels were HEEEEEEAVY, and those Suntour thumb-shifters weren't as great as I thought they'd be.  The Maguras were nice brakes.  It had that going for it.  So it wasn't really a great bike to ride.  Did some snow-riding.  Some kid-trailer-pulling.  Decided I preferred my other bikes.

Happy ending, though.  I sold the Spin wheels to a guy on CL for $250.  And then he said he wanted a bike for his daughter, so I slapped some random wheels on the Trek and sold that to him for another $150!  Best I've ever done flipping any vehicle ever.

Moral of the story - there's always some sucker on CL waiting to buy a vintage MTB.  Don't be that sucker!

BoxheadTim
BoxheadTim MegaDork
7/25/18 11:24 p.m.
USERNAMETAKEN said:
BoxheadTim said:

Any opinions on Proflex 856s? I've been keeping an eye out for a cheapo MTB that's not a complete disaster. I've read up on them a bit and it sound like the rear swingarm can crack but couldn't find much else.

Are those worth a gamble at 200-ish before haggling?

Well, I guess that would depend on your reason for buying it.  If you want to buy it to collect a classic old mtb that is unique and was well regarded at the time, then probably $200 would be reasonable for a very nice example.

If you want a bike for riding, then I think you could do better.  I was a huge mtb guy in the 90's and love all the silly stuff from then, but today's bikes are just so much better.  There's nothing that old Proflex will do better than a modern bike.  The Diamondback discussed above is a MUCH nicer bike.

It would be mostly for riding, but (of course) on the cheap. At least the used MTB market is a bit weird out here from what I can tell - there's not much newer good quality (as in, recognisable brand) stuff to be had for less that 600-800 bucks. As a result I have the choice between a newer el cheapo bike or an older bike. Usually in that case I tend to pick the older but higher quality item but if it makes more sense to get a newer cheap bike then I'd obviously consider that instead.

Ian F
Ian F MegaDork
7/26/18 5:13 a.m.

In reply to BoxheadTim :

Most ProFlex bikes were factory fitted with a Girvin linkage fork, which wasn't a bad fork for the day but was limited in travel and tended to need maintenance on the many pivots. 

One problem with a used $200 bike from the 90's is how much additional $ will it need to be ridable? Especially if it's been sitting for years in someone's shed.  There's a good chance it'll need new tires (figure $20 ea or more), tubes (a few $ ea), and maybe a complete tear down, servicing and tune-up.  Possibly a new cassette and chain. Maybe new brake and derailleur cables. None are a huge expense on their own, but it adds up and can double the cost of the bike.  Some $200 bikes are worth $400. A lot are not. 

Of course, I spend nearly $200 just on a pair of tires... so my perspective is flawed. 

Furious_E
Furious_E SuperDork
7/26/18 7:50 a.m.

I pulled the trigger on that Diamondback last night. The XL size had been showing out of stock on their website since I had been looking (I'm 6'2-6'3 33" inseam, so right on the border for sizing) and last night the L started showing out of stock as well. Figured I better E36 M3 or get off the pot, so I found another retailer showing the large in stock and placed an order. Now I'm anxiously awaiting shipping confirmation!

MazdaFace
MazdaFace Dork
7/26/18 8:31 a.m.

In reply to Furious_E :

nice! Congrats that's awesome. Definitely going to need pics when it shows up

Ashyukun (Robert)
Ashyukun (Robert) UltraDork
7/26/18 9:07 a.m.

In reply to Ransom :

Thanks! It's been a great bike. I've on occasion wondered if should consider replacing it with a newer, more modern, lighter bike but somewhat ironically every bike store employee I've talked to about this (usually when I've had the Fuji in for something) has looked at it and listened to what I use it for and have said to not bother and to just keep riding the Fuji until it's not possible to keep it on the road any more (which, given it's been around for 30 years now, isn't likely to be anytime soon as long as it's maintained and I don't wreck it).

coexist
coexist Reader
7/26/18 9:57 a.m.
MazdaFace said:

In reply to coexist :

What size did she get? And how tall is she? There are basically zero salsa dealers near me that stock this bike so I'm on the fence between a 52cm or a 54cm. My road bike and single speed are both 52cm, but my previous road bike was a 54. Looking at the geometry on the salsa, a lot of the specs for the 54cm salsa look an awful lot like the specs on my 52cm pure fix.  I'm 5'8 for what it's worth.

She's about 5'6" and bought the 52. As usual it's the top tube length that matters more than seat tube.

coexist
coexist Reader
7/26/18 10:05 a.m.

Bike I've had the longest. Early 70's Gitane TdF. It's funny to read about the "old" 90's bikes you guys have.

This is the most recent build over last winter, and have been riding it a lot this year. Univega also from the 70's, managed to fit 40mm Gravelkings in there. Now has a 39/30 crank. (repost, sorry)

BoxheadTim
BoxheadTim MegaDork
7/26/18 10:16 a.m.

In reply to Ian F :

All good points. I haven't seen the bike in person yet as it's a bit of a trek there but it sounds like it might not be the ideal solution. I see catch up maintenance similar to a used car, where one wouldn't necessarily add the cost of new tires to the vehicles value either.

One of my reluctances of spending a fair amount of money on an MTB is that it'll be a bit of a beater (doubling as a pit bike, for example) and I don't know if I actually like riding an MTB.

MazdaFace
MazdaFace Dork
7/26/18 11:00 a.m.

In reply to coexist :

well I found a dealer about 45 minutes (1 hour with traffic is more realistic) that has a 52 & a 54 in stock (with the 700c wheels), so at least I'll be able to sit on both before I have the one I want for me. Top tube length for my 52cm pure fix is identical to the 52mm salsa. But everything else seems to be quite a bit off (stack/reach on purefix is 517/393; stack/reach on salsa is 544/364 for the 52 as an example). I suppose I'll just have to stop trying to crunch numbers and make some time to go actually sit on a few of them and have the dealer help me figure out which one will be best for longer rides.

mfennell
mfennell Reader
7/26/18 1:43 p.m.
Ashyukun (Robert) said:

Can't take a picture and post it at the moment since both myself and the bike are sitting in a secured office where picture-taking is verboten (and theoretically I'm one of the ones who is supposed to enforce that), but my long-serving commuter bike is a 1987 Fuji Del Rey.

 

Nice.  My first "real" bike was a Del Rey from '84 or so. 

I'm a cycling nut  The 1/2 of my friends who aren't car nuts are cycling nuts.  4 of us just spent 5 days out in Park City Utah riding.  My perfect Saturday morning is meeting my friends at 6AM at the corner by my house and hammering away for 2 or 3 hours, back before the rest of our families are really up and moving.

These days I split my road riding between a Gary Fisher Cronus I keep at work (bought the frame on eBay from Mr. Fisher himself) and an S-WORKS Tarmac.  In the woods, I have an S-WORKS hardtail and an Asylum OCD (built by Titus in '08 - one of the first FS 29ers).  I also have an old Vitus hanging in the basement for some reason and a '95 Merlin converted to SS that hangs in the garage on flat tires.

My first real MTB was a '94 GT Karakoram.  I gave the frame to a friend nearly 20 years ago and he still has it.  I'm getting it back to hang in my basement pain cave. Many fond memories of rides on that bike.

 

 

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