ProDarwin
ProDarwin MegaDork
4/12/22 2:20 p.m.

I've used a "rebuild" kit on the tanks of both toilets in my house over the past 5 years and they have never quite worked properly.  Currently I have one I just broke the chain on trying to fix (the chain would always tangle and the flapper wouldn't close all the way).  The other one the handle is in the process of snapping, and also the flapper doesn't quite close all the way sometimes as well.

What is the easy button to fix these once and fix them right?  I want a zero percent chance of the flapper geting stuck, or them running continuously, or just breaking in the next decade.

What am I doing wrong?

1988RedT2
1988RedT2 MegaDork
4/12/22 2:26 p.m.

There is no such thing as perfection.

That said, I've had the best luck by going to my local commercial plumbing supply (because everything on the shelf at Lowe's-Depot is literally crap) and giving them the molded in part number in the tank lid (works best if you have Kohler or other major brand) and getting the "factory authorized" repair parts.

The Lowes-Depot stuff often sports the word "Universal" which means that it might fit some fixtures, but will work well in none of them.

barefootcyborg5000
barefootcyborg5000 PowerDork
4/12/22 2:37 p.m.

What he said^^^
Commercial supplier is the answer. Universal parts are universally crap. 

lnlogauge
lnlogauge HalfDork
4/12/22 2:42 p.m.

right way? replace it. If its old enough to have a flapper and a chain, its old enough to be replaced. toilet technology? has come a long way in 15 years. Old toilets leak, and clog frequently. After replacing all the toilets in my previous house, and all of them in my current house, its pretty easy to do. American Standard is by far the best made one Ive purchased. 

bgkast
bgkast PowerDork
4/12/22 2:49 p.m.

I've had good luck with fluidmaster. The new flapper chains are plastic so they float rather than getting caught up in the flapper.

ProDarwin
ProDarwin MegaDork
4/12/22 2:50 p.m.
lnlogauge said:

right way? replace it. If its old enough to have a flapper and a chain, its old enough to be replaced. toilet technology? has come a long way in 15 years. Old toilets leak, and clog frequently. After replacing all the toilets in my previous house, and all of them in my current house, its pretty easy to do. American Standard is by far the best made one Ive purchased. 

What does the inside of a new toilet look like?  It doesn't have a similar float valve & flapper?  If its a more robust system, I am open to replacing.

 

That said, I looked mine up, it is a Gerber 28-790 and I found parts here:

https://gerberparts.com/collections/gerber-28-790-toilet-parts

looks like I would need a handle, flush valve and fill valve - so about $60 for all of it.

ProDarwin
ProDarwin MegaDork
4/12/22 2:51 p.m.
bgkast said:

I've had good luck with fluidmaster. The new flapper chains are plastic so they float rather than getting caught up in the flapper.

This is what was in my toiler that I could never get to work properly.  Then when trying to adjust it I just broke it.

SV reX
SV reX MegaDork
4/12/22 2:57 p.m.

In reply to ProDarwin :

Newer units generally don't have a float on an arm with a chain and flapper. 
 

It's more like a float that rides up and down a pole. 
 

 

ProDarwin
ProDarwin MegaDork
4/12/22 2:59 p.m.
SV reX said:

In reply to ProDarwin :

Newer units generally don't have a float on an arm with a chain and flapper. 
 

It's more like a float that rides up and down a pole. 
 

 

I'm confused, those are 2 different parts, right?

The universal rebuild kits I used in the past, as well as the ones I referenced above using a fill valve that has the float riding up and down the pole.  The flush is still a flapper though.

fill valve:

Gerber Gerber 99-300 Fill Valve GER-99-300

flush:

Gerber 99-648 Flush Valve GER-0099648

What does the flush look like on a newer toilet?

I don't see what the fundamental difference would be between new and old toilets where that wouldn't be part of whatever kit I install.  New toilets still have a large round gasket sealing the tank to the bowl, right?

SV reX
SV reX MegaDork
4/12/22 3:04 p.m.

In reply to ProDarwin :

Excuse me. You're right. 
 

I was referring to REALLY old ones!

ProDarwin
ProDarwin MegaDork
4/12/22 3:16 p.m.

Ok, so all that said... is there a trick with the handle & chain adjustment/arrangement to keep it from getting tangled, sticking, etc?  I'm assuming the "ball-style" chain is probably the most resistant to that?

1988RedT2
1988RedT2 MegaDork
4/12/22 3:23 p.m.

If you do end up replacing the entire fixture(s), they make nice planters for the front yard.  Sure to be a hit with the neighbors!

Nothing says "classy" like a toilet in your yard.

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c9/15/3f/c9153f4def9cbbe4d4f0e1ee938ea49a.jpg

RevRico
RevRico UltimaDork
4/12/22 3:24 p.m.

In reply to ProDarwin :

Regular chain with zero slack when the flapper is the whole way down has always worked for me.

californiamilleghia
californiamilleghia UltraDork
4/12/22 4:05 p.m.

And " that " question , 

how do you clean a very stained toilet bowl , 

the old style  glandular stuff that bubbled does not seem to be sold anymore , 

and the liquid stuff that we used before changed their formula and does not work anymore !
 

thanks for your help

BenB
BenB HalfDork
4/12/22 4:11 p.m.

While you're in there, check the bolts that hold the tank on the lower part. They'll rust through and fall off while you're not home, then the tank will start to leak onto the floor, the float valve will constantly refill the tank as the water drains out, and you'll end up paying for major water damage. Ask me how I know. 

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