Apexcarver
Apexcarver SuperDork
4/14/09 7:57 p.m.

I was going through my fathers old textbooks and technical books that have been boxed up in the basement to see what ones might apply to my field of study. (for reference, my father passed away in 1997) I figured that it might be good to have differing books handy that looked at things form a different viewpoint. Now, my father majored in physics and was employed in the nuclear field for most of his professional life. (got cancer from his job and hence I have NO desire to TOUCH nuclear as a subject) I am majoring in Materials Engineering.

My father was in college around 1970, so naturally most of the books were of about that age.

One was a Mechanical Engineers handbook copyrighted 1930.

Then I noticed a small, black, leather bond with flap pocket book.

Trautwine's Engineer's Pocket-Book.

looked in it and the print date is 1876

How to lay railroad track, use of animal power to run mechanisms, and countless other practical knowledge of a bygone age.

When I asked my mom about it, she said she had totally forgotten we had it. She recounted my father discovering it at a secondhand book sale and being jubilant at finding it (he had been seeking a copy of this text for 2 decades or more as she told it)

book is discussed in this link http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi895.htm

I thought some of the other engineer-types on here would find it interesting (plus i wanted to show off my discovery)

ignorant
ignorant SuperDork
4/14/09 8:00 p.m.

cool

Stuc
Stuc HalfDork
4/14/09 8:17 p.m.

one horsepower

Dr. Hess
Dr. Hess SuperDork
4/14/09 8:28 p.m.

Doode, As a service to the world, you need to scan that book on a real scanner, save it to a PDF and stick it on teh 1ntr4w3b, yo.

jamscal
jamscal HalfDork
4/14/09 8:42 p.m.
Dr. Hess wrote: Doode, As a service to the world, you need to scan that book on a real scanner, save it to a PDF and stick it on teh 1ntr4w3b, yo.

Already there

http://www.archive.org/details/civilengineerspo00traurich

Luke
Luke Dork
4/14/09 8:43 p.m.

That's awesome.

"It ends with a section of blank lined paper." - Is this section filled with any notes? Perhaps from the original owner.

Monkeywrench
Monkeywrench Reader
4/14/09 8:54 p.m.

Wow, awesome stuff. Thanks

Apexcarver
Apexcarver SuperDork
4/14/09 9:01 p.m.

There is only one note back there on finding the HP of a steam engine, and its not an equation sadly...

the pictures dont begin to show the illustrations and content of the book, it would take forever to upload all of the cool diagrams and illustrations in photo form.

EastCoastMojo
EastCoastMojo Dork
4/14/09 9:30 p.m.

How berkeleying cool is that?

Pretty berkeleying cool I'd say

Gimp
Gimp Dork
4/14/09 9:32 p.m.

Very cool. I'll have to scope that out for the typography sometime.

stuart in mn
stuart in mn Dork
4/14/09 10:14 p.m.

Pretty cool. My nephew has a copy of that same book, although I believe his is a newer edition from around the turn of the century. Old textbooks and reference books like that can still be plenty useful - I have a copy of the CRC Physics and Chemistry Handbook on my shelf at work that was printed in 1938 I use regularly. I also have a couple of my dad's college textbooks from the 1920s that I pull off the shelf from time to time.

Monkeywrench
Monkeywrench Reader
4/16/09 10:47 p.m.

WOW!!! I just sat down and scanned through the book. If I can't find a copy pretty soon, I'm just going to have it printed out and I'll put it in a binder.

Apexcarver
Apexcarver SuperDork
4/16/09 10:56 p.m.

Monkey, i was looking around and trying to see just how rare it might be, there are apparrently a decent number of copies still around.

I would start here http://www.bookfinder.com/search/?author=trautwine&title=&lang=en&submit=Begin+search&new_used=*&destination=us&currency=USD&mode=basic&st=sr&ac=qr

neon4891
neon4891 SuperDork
4/16/09 11:36 p.m.

that Trumps the 2 Motors Manuals Sitting on by book case from the 70's

John Brown
John Brown SuperDork
4/17/09 6:37 a.m.

Beats my Motors Import from the 70s as well.

Jensenman
Jensenman SuperDork
4/17/09 9:00 a.m.

Now that's pretty dang cool. Can't help but wonder what the 'tumbling switch' was for.

foxtrapper
foxtrapper SuperDork
4/17/09 9:15 a.m.

"Should experts in engineering complain that they do not find anything of interest in this volume, the writer would merely remind then that it was not his intention that they should."

Now that's funny!

Wally
Wally SuperDork
4/17/09 9:24 a.m.
Jensenman wrote: Now that's pretty dang cool. Can't help but wonder what the 'tumbling switch' was for.

It looks like the switch for a railroad track, we still have a few here on some of the scenic railroads.

Tim Baxter
Tim Baxter Online Editor
4/17/09 9:27 a.m.

I have a Motor from the 60s that was my grandfather's. I'm trumped, too.

ignorant
ignorant SuperDork
4/17/09 9:35 a.m.

I have my grandfathers slide rule. It's ivory.

Plus his machinists tool chest from the 20's with micrometers etc..

mattmacklind
mattmacklind SuperDork
4/17/09 2:02 p.m.

I have my grandfathers notes from law school.

I am also a book collector. You may want to search on alibris.com or abebooks.com and check any values on other copies of the book in similar condition to get an idea what it may be worth. Science/tech books don't generally appreciate but thats not always true. I love that typeface, classic.

Woody
Woody Dork
4/17/09 6:41 p.m.

Hmmm.....engineering student around 1970....any chance he had a Curta?

If he did and you'd like to sell it, I might be interested.

mel_horn
mel_horn HalfDork
4/18/09 1:49 a.m.
neon4891 wrote: that Trumps the 2 Motors Manuals Sitting on by book case from the 70's

And beats the Pantera Service Manual on my shelf (from a Ford/Lincoln/Mercury dealer that never even saw one let alone worked on one)

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