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Mndsm
Mndsm MegaDork
5/14/18 12:57 p.m.
NOHOME said:

If you are eating Poutine and can understand the people around you, you are not eating Poutine.

 

Pete

What if I speak French? (I dont, but I get a lot of Latin based languages because Spanish lessons. )

Suprf1y
Suprf1y PowerDork
5/14/18 1:01 p.m.
NOHOME said:

If you are eating Poutine and can understand the people around you, you are not eating Poutine.

 

Pete

LOL at Americans talking about Poutine like they know what it is.

Next thing you know they'll start a thread about the NHL playoffs.

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner MegaDork
5/14/18 1:06 p.m.
Mndsm said:
NOHOME said:

If you are eating Poutine and can understand the people around you, you are not eating Poutine.

Pete

What if I speak French? (I dont, but I get a lot of Latin based languages because Spanish lessons. )

Quebec French isn't really French. I mean, they can understand Parisians well enough, but someone from France is lost when met with a proper Quebecois accent and vocabulary.

Mndsm
Mndsm MegaDork
5/14/18 1:08 p.m.

In reply to Keith Tanner :

Sorta like cockney to american English I assume. 

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner MegaDork
5/14/18 1:20 p.m.

Pretty good analogy - as a cockney can make himself understood to an American if he wants, same as a Quebecois can. It's 18th century European French that was left to simmer for a couple of centuries. It's got a Texan-style drawl to it and a bunch of English words bolted on along with some archaic terms. It's also less standardized than Parisian French, so you get more dialects.

NOHOME
NOHOME UltimaDork
5/14/18 2:03 p.m.
Keith Tanner said:
Mndsm said:
NOHOME said:

If you are eating Poutine and can understand the people around you, you are not eating Poutine.

Pete

What if I speak French? (I dont, but I get a lot of Latin based languages because Spanish lessons. )

Quebec French isn't really French. I mean, they can understand Parisians well enough, but someone from France is lost when met with a proper Quebecois accent and vocabulary.

I can go to Belgium, I can go to France and I can go to Gabon and get by with my French capabilities. But in Quebec I might as well be speaking Khoisan. The language Mothership in France don't think much of the French spoken in Quebec either, making it ironic that Canada spends millions of dollars every year to "Preserve" the language.

But staying on topic, yeah, Quebec its a good place to go for the heart attack on a plate known as Poutine.And then there is the wumanz in that province, kind of like ambulant Poutine, a lot of good stuff that will not end well...but I digress...

 

Pete

 

NickD
NickD UberDork
5/14/18 2:04 p.m.

I'll pass on poutine. More of a garbage plate person myself, being from Central New York

Dave
Dave Reader
5/14/18 2:15 p.m.

I still think the best poutine is from Canadian Costcos.

eastsideTim
eastsideTim UltraDork
5/14/18 3:53 p.m.

This thread is bumming me out.  Can’t get traditional poutine near me, only “gourmet-ized” stuff.  Although one place that uses braised short rib on top is pretty good, but they don’t use gravy, they use some sort of cheese sauce (in addition cheese curds).

Mndsm
Mndsm MegaDork
5/14/18 4:08 p.m.

In reply to eastsideTim :

It's not that hard. Get curds. Make fries. Do gravy. Eat. 

 

I actually got a big pile of it an hour ago at Disney springs. It was very good. 

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
5/14/18 10:42 p.m.

This thread has me thinking, if Canada has french, what does the US have? Then I remembered Cajuns. Annnnnd now I want jambalaya and gumbo.

dculberson
dculberson UltimaDork
5/15/18 6:31 a.m.
NOHOME said:

If you are eating Poutine and can understand the people around you, you are not eating Poutine.

 

Pete

Poutine gatekeeping. (Rolls eyes)

It’s not exactly rocket science. 

MadScientistMatt
MadScientistMatt PowerDork
5/15/18 7:32 a.m.
Mndsm said:

In reply to eastsideTim :

It's not that hard. Get curds. Make fries. Do gravy. Eat. 

 

The first step tends to be the trickiest. I'm not sure I've seen curds at the grocery store.

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner MegaDork
5/15/18 9:37 a.m.

I've found them locally and we're not in much of a cheese area. It'll be around, just ask the cheese guy at your grocery store.

Poutine's kind of like a hamburger. Anyone can make an okay burger or pile a lot of crap on it and call it artisan. But it's harder to get the basics right and make a really good one.

eastsideTim
eastsideTim UltraDork
5/15/18 9:40 a.m.

Curds are easy for me to get.  I think the fries are the hard part.  I don’t have a deep fryer, and the oven ones are only so so.  Guess I could prepare some gravy, buy some curds, and right before I want poutine, run out for a couple of supersize fries from McDonalds.

D2W
D2W HalfDork
5/15/18 9:40 a.m.

I have obviously never had proper Poutine. What is this squeaking you speak of?

MadScientistMatt
MadScientistMatt PowerDork
5/15/18 9:52 a.m.
eastsideTim said:

 I think the fries are the hard part.  I don’t have a deep fryer, and the oven ones are only so so. 

I've made some pretty fries ones on the stovetop - just takes a large cooking pot and a slotted spoon. A candy thermometer makes it a lot easier to get good, consistent results.

dculberson
dculberson UltimaDork
5/15/18 10:06 a.m.

Matt's right - it's not hard to pan fry good french fries. Just be careful of the oil temp - keep it hot enough but not too hot - you don't want a stovetop grease fire! I have a deep fryer but find myself doing stovetop fries more often just because cleanup is so much easier. 375 degrees or so on the oil, and keep a close eye on the fries so they don't get burnt. If you let the oil get too cold your fries will be greasy and limp. It only takes about 5 minutes or less to fry 'em, too. Much faster than the oven.

Amazingly enough, done right, they don't absorb much of the oil, either. I filter my oil back into a jar after it cools and the jar is just about as full after frying as it was before. Again if the oil is too cold, more of it soaks in, so you have a double dose of sadness. (Fries not as good, PLUS eating more oil than you meant to.)

I have one of these thermometers:

https://www.amazon.com/Lavatools-PT12-Javelin-Thermometer-Chipotle/dp/B00GRFHXVQ/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1526396715&sr=8-5&keywords=quick+read+meat+thermometer

and use it in the kitchen ALL THE TIME. It's amazing to have a super fast read, nicely accurate thermometer. I use it for everything from baby bottles to grilled meat to cooking oil temp to ...

Mndsm
Mndsm MegaDork
5/15/18 10:10 a.m.
D2W said:

I have obviously never had proper Poutine. What is this squeaking you speak of?

Proper white cheddar cheese curds squeak on your teeth when you bite them, hence the term squeaky cheese. 

Keith Tanner
Keith Tanner MegaDork
5/15/18 10:13 a.m.

They also only squeak when fresh. You've got about a 24 hour window IIRC.

It even says Squeak! on the package for St. Albert curds. Or Couic in French, which is probably more accurate in an onomatopœic sense.

BMWGeoff
BMWGeoff New Reader
5/15/18 10:21 a.m.

As someone who grew up in Ottawa, this thread makes me happy.

St. Albert cheese curds with St. Hubert gravy is my go-to homemade combo.

I'll have to check out the place on Hwy 7 in Sharbot Lake this weekend, my in-laws have a trailer a bit east of there.

Woody
Woody MegaDork
5/15/18 11:41 a.m.

In reply to Keith Tanner :

Five Bonus Points for the first use of the word "onomatopœic" on the GRM Forum.

Hal
Hal UltraDork
5/15/18 3:24 p.m.
Keith Tanner said:

Quebec French isn't really French. I mean, they can understand Parisians well enough, but someone from France is lost when met with a proper Quebecois accent and vocabulary.

Keith, Thanks for bringing back some memories and a few laughs.  When I was in high school one of our neighbors was my high school French teacher.  A very proper Parisian Frenchman.   Another neighbor (who owned the local garage) was a Quebecois (don't call him French Canadian!).   And my father could speak fairly fluent French. Except that he learned it in Marseille when he was based there as a sailor for 3 years between the World Wars.

They would frequently meet at the garage and liked to practice their French.  The funny part was when they had to revert to English to make each other understand.

NOHOME
NOHOME UltimaDork
5/15/18 3:52 p.m.
dculberson said:
NOHOME said:

If you are eating Poutine and can understand the people around you, you are not eating Poutine.

 

Pete

Poutine gatekeeping. (Rolls eyes)

It’s not exactly rocket science. 

My point being that a lot of foods are a cultural experience for me and don't work as well of context.The background of Franglais patois serves as an ingredient.  I don't even eat the stuff if I am back home, would not occur to me. Same deal with Croissants or Pain au Chocolat and France.  While I Jones for the stuff when in France, they are just crumbly bread products in NA and not something I would cross the street for.

If that makes me a gatekeeper, so be it.

 

Pete

Stampie
Stampie UberDork
11/9/18 12:03 p.m.

I finally got to try poutine today. I now want to move to Quebec. 

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