TurnerX19
TurnerX19 UltraDork
6/13/22 10:27 p.m.

In reply to NickD :

Well. if you are what you eat, yes they are.

Recon1342
Recon1342 SuperDork
6/13/22 11:24 p.m.

Not so much TIL, more TYL: 

For those of you who use Roku's streaming service- ever wonder why it's called a fire stick?

In "Avatar, the Last Airbender", the incarnation of the Avatar that preceded Aang (the main character) was Avatar Roku. He was a member of the Fire Nation.

That's a thing you know now. 

dculberson
dculberson MegaDork
6/14/22 6:45 a.m.

In reply to Recon1342 :

Roku and Fire Stick are competitors. (Fire is from Amazon)

Brett_Murphy (Agent of Chaos)
Brett_Murphy (Agent of Chaos) MegaDork
6/14/22 11:08 a.m.
Pete. (l33t FS) said:  The 90s were the high water mark for Japanese manufacturing/engineering, like American makes in the 60s, and then after that they either phoned it in or just kept cranking out the same stuff... like American makes after the 60s.

The economic recession the Japanese had from 1991 to 2001 slowed down their car market quite a bit.

Duke
Duke MegaDork
6/14/22 12:55 p.m.
NickD said:

TIL that the Dutch once had a prime minister they didn't much care for, so they are him. Yes, they are him. That'd make me think twice about running for that office "I mean, they did it once...."

I can only assume DAMN YOU AUTOCORRECT

 

NickD
NickD MegaDork
6/14/22 1:10 p.m.
Duke said:
NickD said:

TIL that the Dutch once had a prime minister they didn't much care for, so they ate him. Yes, they ate him. That'd make me think twice about running for that office "I mean, they did it once...."

I can only assume DAMN YOU AUTOCORRECT

Yes. berkeleying nonsense.

Duke
Duke MegaDork
6/16/22 9:58 p.m.

TIL that The Professor from Gilligan's Island was a B-24 bombardier with 44 combat missions under his hat.

 

M2Pilot
M2Pilot Dork
6/16/22 10:05 p.m.

In reply to Duke :

Seems he broke both ankles when he was shot down & received purple heart.

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
6/17/22 12:40 a.m.

B-24s do not crash well. Most of the time, you were better off bailing out.

Stampie
Stampie MegaDork
6/27/22 12:17 a.m.

TIL there are an estimated 100s of billions stars in our galaxy.

TIL there are an estimated 20 trillion galaxies in the universe.

So if you say there's a 1 in a billion chance of life outside our solar system in the Milky Way then there's an estimated 20,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 "live" civilizations out there.

 

914Driver
914Driver MegaDork
6/27/22 8:43 a.m.

Bees.

I don't because I hate getting stung.  My son had one, then two and eventually four hives; all Italian Bees.  That's what was availalble at the time.  

I learned Italian Bees are like Italian cars, slim, fast, moody and require lots of maintenance.  After his last hive swarmed (they just pack up and leave) Ian took a year off from it but this year got Canadian Bees.  Yowzah!  These guys are bigger, just blue collar type worker bees.  Give 'em a little sugar water and they're off and running.  He usually checks on the hives once a week, the Italians stung you and took the next day off, the Canadians damn near filled the hive with honey on one week!

Ian still sets up hives in Manhattan, good for the flowers in a big city.  I've only done it once, but imagine driving through Manhattan in a small station wagon, two guys dressed in bee suits with wooden shoe boxes stacked in the back; each box contains 10,000 bees.  Oh, and there's a smoker hanging inside a rear window so the interior is filled with white smoke.  They're funny about us taking the elevator to the roof so we hike it up stairs.  Without bees all the flowers would die.

TIL.

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
6/27/22 9:57 a.m.

Duke
Duke MegaDork
6/27/22 9:58 a.m.
Stampie said:

TIL there are an estimated 100s of billions stars in our galaxy.

TIL there are an estimated 20 trillion galaxies in the universe.

So if you say there's a 1 in a billion chance of life outside our solar system in the Milky Way then there's an estimated 20,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 "live" civilizations out there.

Yep.  Those that have trouble accepting this concept don't seem to mind the ideas of 'eternity' or 'omnipotence' but can't seem to grasp 'very, very many places for a really, really long time'.

 

Karacticus
Karacticus SuperDork
6/27/22 10:29 p.m.

TIL (OK, it was actually Saturday) that the finance guy at the car dealership will try and sell you electronic rust protection for your new car. Claimed it had sacrificial anodes and electric current. 
 

I wonder if it plugs into the lighter socket and improves fuel mileage as well-- though I hear that takes magnets. 

Jay_W
Jay_W SuperDork
6/27/22 10:35 p.m.

In reply to Karacticus :

Ships use that scheme altbough they don't need to plug anything in, the sacrificial zinc anode makes its own potential 'tween it and the hull. I've heard of this being tried on cars but I don't know if it works. Seems like of it did it would be OEM prettymuch everywhere.

Karacticus
Karacticus SuperDork
6/27/22 10:47 p.m.

In reply to Jay_W :

Aware of the marine use-- at least there's water for an electrolyte there. 

Apparently it plugs into the OBD port instead of the lighter plug, so it must work indecision

Recon1342
Recon1342 SuperDork
6/27/22 11:22 p.m.

In reply to Karacticus :

I'm sure that little plastic doodad protects itself from rust quite well. After a few New England winters, it's probably gonna be the only thing left.

RX Reven'
RX Reven' UltraDork
6/27/22 11:49 p.m.
Stampie said:

So if you say there's a 1 in a billion chance of life outside our solar system in the Milky Way then there's an estimated 20,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 "live" civilizations out there.

 

In the absence of some mechanism that drives "necessity", the odds are wildly, vanishingly less than one in a billion.

In fact, again, baring "necessity", if all of the matter in the visible universe were to be comprised of organic compounds and everything were to be mixing as fast as theoretically possible based on Planck minimums of distance (ten to the minus 35 meters) and Planck minimums of time (10 to the minus 43 seconds) to produce the greatest probabilistic resource imaginable, we'd still have essentially zero chance of life ever forming even for a moment anywhere in the visible universe.

I always hear "you just can't comprehend how vast and ancient the universe is" which is completely true but I don't have to, I just need to mathematically model how many rolls of the dice the universe has had (probabilistic resource) and what percent of dice rolls produce life (consensus estimate currently stands at something like one in ten to the power of 534).

I'm all for searching for the elusive source of "necessity" but until discovered, subscribing to neo-Darwinism is a form of religion not science...BTW, I call it neo-Darwinism as Darwin himself wrote in The Origin of Species that he had no idea how life originated and he acknowledged that the Cambrian Explosion was a conspicuous violation of what his theory predicts.

One alternative to "necessity" is the multiverse as that gives an infinite probabilistic resource but that's just another blind faith religious notion like the "necessity" concept that nobody has discovered despite dozens (hundreds?) of top scholars dedicating their careers to it for well over a century.  

I fully respect everyone's right to believe what they want but all I've seen thrown at what many organic chemists, micro biologists, and statisticians (who are either retired or have tenure) is mockery and ridicule.

Blast away...

Appleseed
Appleseed MegaDork
6/28/22 1:59 a.m.

67% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

Woody (Forum Supportum)
Woody (Forum Supportum) MegaDork
6/28/22 4:07 a.m.

In reply to RX Reven' :

That was fascinating. Thank you. 
 

I've often thought that we are alone in the universe... but maybe that's just because we're first. 

RevRico
RevRico UltimaDork
6/28/22 5:58 a.m.

In reply to RX Reven' :

I just think you're extrapolating an answer from an incomplete data set is all. 

We don't even know how big the universe is, heck, we don't even know what the shape of the universe is. We like to think we know how old it is, but to guess that number, we go strictly on what we can observe, which can be very misleading if instead of a massive flatish plane like we think it was a toroidal or spherical shape allowing light to loop around itself, which is an accepted theory. 

We've only really been able to look for ~150 years. 150 years is barely a statistical anomaly on geological and cosmological time scales, not even the blink of an eye. 

To pretend 100-150 years is enough to draw such conclusions when it took us as a species, 150,000 years to get to the point of being able to look and think we're maybe beginning to figure things out is just childish. 

If anything, the massive exponential advancements in technological growth over the last 150 years compared to the last 150,000 years points at outside help more than the hairless monkeys finally figuring things out on their own. 

150,000 years to build an airplane, 60 years to go from a 10 foot flight to landing on the moon? Little fishy to me. Having seemingly lost that same technology in another 60 years? Very very strange.

dculberson
dculberson MegaDork
6/28/22 11:43 a.m.
RevRico said:

150,000 years to build an airplane, 60 years to go from a 10 foot flight to landing on the moon? Little fishy to me. Having seemingly lost that same technology in another 60 years? Very very strange.

What technology is "seemingly lost?" We've put thousands of rockets into space since the moon landings and 100% of the technology used to get us to the moon has been made obsolete by the massive gains in efficiency and safety we've made since then. There's been nothing lost, only improved. No we haven't landed on the moon but it's enormously expensive to do so and we need to see some sort of benefit from doing it again. We will, when we're ready.

I don't even know where to start with the "aliens must have helped us," so I'll just skip right over that except to say that technology improves exponentially. It's easy to go directly from a knife to a spear but next to impossible to go from picking up rocks to throw at animals to launching rockets. There's no mysterious missing pieces in our tech progression, we understand pretty well how we got from barely lifting off the ground to landing on the moon. It is one of the least fishy things in the world.

RX Reven'
RX Reven' UltraDork
6/28/22 11:50 a.m.
RevRico said:

In reply to RX Reven' :

"I just think you're extrapolating an answer from an incomplete data set..." & "To pretend 100-150 years is enough to draw such conclusions..."

Honestly, I don't believe I have any answers nor do I feel ready to draw any conclusions, I'm just challenging those that hold up neo-Darwinism as a source of answers and conclusions when from my prospective, it has more holes in it than a block of Swiss cheese.

I've been confronted with the question "if we were designed, who designed the designer" as though it's some sort of gauntlet dropper.  I have no idea, that's not my area of interest, and it doesn't matter anyway as not knowing does nothing to make neo-Darwinism any less Swiss cheesy.

Since the time of the great philosophers three fundamental questions have been pondered...where did the universe come from, where did life come from, and what is the nature of consciousness.  In the thousands of years that have passed, none of the questions have been answered and no new questions have been added.

I have a life long passion for statistical analysis and of the three fundamental questions "where did life come from" is by far the most applicable place for me to practice my craft.  In the absence of "necessity" or multiverse, I think the math is telling us that neo-Darwinism is rubbish.

I will not be at all surprised if we one day discover something that makes the math work but until that time, I think we're just practicing a new blind faith form of religion and calling it science. 

Duke
Duke MegaDork
6/28/22 11:51 a.m.
RevRico said:

In reply to RX Reven' :

If anything, the massive exponential advancements in technological growth over the last 150 years compared to the last 150,000 years points at outside help more than the hairless monkeys finally figuring things out on their own. 

150,000 years to build an airplane, 60 years to go from a 10 foot flight to landing on the moon? Little fishy to me. Having seemingly lost that same technology in another 60 years? Very very strange.

Wait, whut?!

We haven't "lost the technology" to go to the moon at all.

What we've lost is the political will to do so.  We could easily be living on the moon right now if there were compelling socioeconomic reasons to do so.  The same with Mars.

What's lacking is the return on investment that makes it worth spending the required treasure on at this point in history.  The technology is absolutely there.

 

Duke
Duke MegaDork
6/28/22 12:20 p.m.
RX Reven' said:
Stampie said:

So if you say there's a 1 in a billion chance of life outside our solar system in the Milky Way then there's an estimated 20,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 "live" civilizations out there.

In the absence of some mechanism that drives "necessity", the odds are wildly, vanishingly less than one in a billion.

So cut that probability down by a dozen orders of magnitude.  A one in a sextillion chance means that there are still 20,000,000,000  - TWENTY BILLION - worlds that have life on them in the universe.

I always hear "you just can't comprehend how vast and ancient the universe is" which is completely true but I don't have to, I just need to mathematically model how many rolls of the dice the universe has had (probabilistic resource) and what percent of dice rolls produce life (consensus estimate currently stands at something like one in ten to the power of 534).

So let's take those 20 billion worlds with potential life on them.  And remember, I'm stipulating that only one in sextillion worlds may have potential life (which I think is way too small a number, but I'm working with that to get closer to your arena).

Each world does not crap out after a single roll of those dice.  The universe is roughly 13 billion years old.  Giving each world a single dice roll per year yields 2.6x10^26 chances for one to develop life.  A single roll for an entire planet!

Now multiply that number by the number of organic compound molecules found in the crust of a given planet.  Think we have gotten to a big number of chances yet?

I'll gladly accept your 10^534 number at face value without arguing.  Given the number of dice rolls available in the history of the entire universe, that's chicken feed.

Believe what you want to believe; it's no skin off my nose.  But it seems... odd to try to veneer it with something else instead of just admitting that it's what you want to believe.  There was a previous forum member here named Dr. Hess who did a lot of that.

 

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