Alan Cesar
Alan Cesar Online Editor
11/5/13 10:02 a.m.

There are no rules.

This is where you can go to post the clever wrench stacking trick your dad taught you, or talk about the best combination of ATF and mineral spirits to penetrate rusty bolts and kill brain cells.

If you can't figure out how to get a certain thing apart, this is also where you can ask those kinds of questions. Removing specialized connectors with standard garage tools, for example.

Post a good one and you'll make it in our e-newsletter. Pictures help.

Sign up for the e-newsletter here:

GRM:
http://grassrootsmotorsports.com/newsletter/

Classic:
http://classicmotorsports.net/newsletter/

Grtechguy
Grtechguy UltimaDork
11/5/13 1:59 p.m.

Can you import the other tech tips section?

I'll admit I don't view it much over there

<------------

http://grassrootsmotorsports.com/tech-tips/

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
11/5/13 11:59 p.m.

I don't think we can do that easily and have it match up to the user's garage and stuff. However, you guys are free to paste those same great tips here.

Tim Suddard
Tim Suddard Publisher
11/6/13 7:19 a.m.

The best tip I have seen lately is when trying to drill a lot of holes in a line to install rivets on a panel. I was at a guy's shop and he had taken an old T square type ruler and just drilled holes every inch. You laid the ruler on the panel you were trying to install rivets on and quickly and accurately just drilled using the holes in the ruler as templates. Simple genius. Perfect results. Wish I had thought of that.

Woody
Woody MegaDork
11/17/13 7:05 p.m.

To remove dents from a motorcycle gas tank, seal up the the fuel outlet, fill it with water, cap it and put it in the freezer. As the water freezes, it will push out the dents. Just be sure to check it frequently and remove it before the seams start to split.

SkinnyG
SkinnyG Dork
5/19/15 11:16 p.m.
Tim Suddard wrote: The best tip I have seen lately is when trying to drill a lot of holes in a line to install rivets on a panel.

I have also heard of using pipe strapping.

EastCoastMojo
EastCoastMojo Mod Squad
4/16/17 4:02 a.m.

Canoe deleted

boxedfox
boxedfox Reader
4/18/19 12:33 p.m.

Opened up the latest issue of our favorite magazine and found that my tech tip submission (along with my left hand) have been immortalized in print.

Thank you GRM!
 

67convtjmD
67convtjmD
5/4/21 12:07 p.m.

1967 Camaro how to install door latch.

RMOCFO
RMOCFO
3/28/22 12:52 a.m.

 

 

Elva Sports Racer.

Your article on rebuilding an Elva sports racer is superb. I am using in comparison to my rebuild of an old Formula V racer, a Zink C4.

There is one error. Your suspension rebuilt uses 316 SS to replace AISI 1018 in a suspension link. 316SS is not a suitable structural material. It is too soft. It is primarily used in corrosive environments. If you need a stainless steel, 17-4 PH would be the choice, although it must be heat treated.

I checked with a materials expert with racing experience. 316 SS is not suitable suspension material but is excellent for race car exhaust systems.

My experience with316SS it is in industrial uses. Linkages made of it stretch and become useless under rather light loads.

 

Ralph Olmsted, PE 

 

Material

Tensile Strength

Ultimate Strength

Elongation

Modulus of Elasticity

Carbon Steel, AISI Grade 1018

53,700 psi           @  2% elongation

63,800 psi

8%

29.0 x 106

Alloy 316 (S31600)

 

Min. 30,000 psi  @ 2% elongation

75,000 psi

15.0 %

29.7 x 106 psi

17-4 PH steel (AMS 5604)

1100o F Heat Treat

Min. 155,000 PSI  @ 2% elongation

Min. 170,000 PSI

10%

28.5 x 106 psi

17-4 PH steel (AMS 5604)

900o F Heat Treat

Min. 115,000 PSI  @ 2% elongation

Min.  140,000 PSI

14%

Modulus of Elasticity 28.5 x 106 psi

 

Note:

AISI 1018 carbon is a good material for structural and machining applications. It is readily weldable without post-weld stress relief.

 

316SS is an austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steel with excellent corrosion resistance but not generally used for structural applications. Welding 316SS required special procedures to avoided weld contamination.

 

17-4PH is a grade of martensitic, precipitation-hardening stainless steel with the additions of chromium, nickel, and copper. 17-4 stainless steel has a valuable combination of high strength, good corrosion resistance, and toughness in both base metals and welds.

 

Stainless steels frequently have a thread galling problem. This is prevented by having a plating shop copper coat the threads.

 

Carbon steel properties courtesy of AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute). Stainless steel properties courtesy of Sandusky Steel Co.

APEowner
APEowner SuperDork
3/28/22 8:15 a.m.
RMOCFO said:

 

 

Elva Sports Racer.

Your article on rebuilding an Elva sports racer is superb. I am using in comparison to my rebuild of an old Formula V racer, a Zink C4.

There is one error. Your suspension rebuilt uses 316 SS to replace AISI 1018 in a suspension link. 316SS is not a suitable structural material. It is too soft. It is primarily used in corrosive environments. If you need a stainless steel, 17-4 PH would be the choice, although it must be heat treated.

I checked with a materials expert with racing experience. 316 SS is not suitable suspension material but is excellent for race car exhaust systems.

My experience with316SS it is in industrial uses. Linkages made of it stretch and become useless under rather light loads.

 

Ralph Olmsted, PE 

 

Material

Tensile Strength

Ultimate Strength

Elongation

Modulus of Elasticity

Carbon Steel, AISI Grade 1018

53,700 psi           @  2% elongation

63,800 psi

8%

29.0 x 106

Alloy 316 (S31600)

 

Min. 30,000 psi  @ 2% elongation

75,000 psi

15.0 %

29.7 x 106 psi

17-4 PH steel (AMS 5604)

1100o F Heat Treat

Min. 155,000 PSI  @ 2% elongation

Min. 170,000 PSI

10%

28.5 x 106 psi

17-4 PH steel (AMS 5604)

900o F Heat Treat

Min. 115,000 PSI  @ 2% elongation

Min.  140,000 PSI

14%

Modulus of Elasticity 28.5 x 106 psi

 

Note:

AISI 1018 carbon is a good material for structural and machining applications. It is readily weldable without post-weld stress relief.

 

316SS is an austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steel with excellent corrosion resistance but not generally used for structural applications. Welding 316SS required special procedures to avoided weld contamination.

 

17-4PH is a grade of martensitic, precipitation-hardening stainless steel with the additions of chromium, nickel, and copper. 17-4 stainless steel has a valuable combination of high strength, good corrosion resistance, and toughness in both base metals and welds.

 

Stainless steels frequently have a thread galling problem. This is prevented by having a plating shop copper coat the threads.

 

Carbon steel properties courtesy of AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute). Stainless steel properties courtesy of Sandusky Steel Co.

All of that is a long way of saying that stainless steel is not a good material for anything unless you really need the corrosion resistant properties.

NOT A TA
NOT A TA UltraDork
6/20/22 2:12 p.m.

EDIT: Realized I posted this in the wrong section of tech tips, perhaps a mod can move this post?

Don't like the little pieces of MIG wire cut offs all over the interior when building a roll cage or floating around getting stuck in shoes or other things? A micro magnet or two in your cut off pliers will keep them in place till you load up the magnets.

[URL=https://app.photobucket.com/u/NOTATA/p/f7309344-c14e-45b6-88b7-47ed670d739d?login=true][/URL]

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