Jan 23, 2009 update to the Innocenti Mini Cooper project car

Mini Progress

Note that despite what this photo shows, we did not do the work in our new showroom. That would be wrong.
This was once a thermostat housing.
We greased the new thermostat gasket and studs.
All buttoned up.

The Mini now has a new thermostat and thermostat housing. Once we get another break, we’ll refill the system and go for a spin.

Gary handled the demolition work. The thermostat housing appeared to be welded in place, so he had to use some extreme measures. In the end, the thermostat housing came off in pieces. Our post-mortem inspection revealed that the housing had welded itself to the studs. The thermostat also looked quite rusty.

When we installed the new thermostat, we greased the thermostat gasket as well as the new studs. This should help the next time we do this job.

And then we could button up the system. Now it’s time to fill the system and go for a test drive. Fingers are crossed.

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Comments
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theshopeac
theshopeac New Reader
1/24/09 7:17 p.m.

Hello Folks, glad you are making progress. I have a suggestion. Get some "anti seize" compound for things like the studs. Anytime you have dissimilar metals that live together for a long time, there is the opportunity for galvanic corrosion to weld them together. If you think there might ever be a need to take them apart someday, a light coating of anti seize is in order. I like the "Lubro Moly brand, that is available through "World Pac" (Check with any decent Euro car shop in your area). It is copper based, and is good on brake parts and spark plug threads too. A little goes a long way, and remember that old adage "An ounce of prevention...." Happy motoring, Jesse

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
1/29/09 3:37 p.m.

Thanks for the advice. We followed Carl's advice and used grease, but it should still keep things from locking together. One of the studs was basically welded to the thermostat housing. It wasn't going to come apart without brute force (and a big hammer).

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