How to mount and balance a tire: a step-by-step guide | Video

https://www.youtube.com/embed/6eZNo18GKQ0

What do autocrossing and track events have in common? Both consume a lot of tires, meaning lots of time–and money–spent getting new tires mounted and balanced.

We wanted an alternative, so we added Bendpak tire mounting and balancing equipment to the GRM workshop so we could do it ourselves.

Follow along to learn how to mount and balance a tire. Presented by CRC Industries.

Colin Wood
Colin Wood Associate Editor
4/19/22 9:08 a.m.

Even as someone who doesn't regularly spend time on track, I could see the value in getting my own equipment to mount and balance tires.

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
4/19/22 10:44 a.m.

Yeah the only thing I would add here is that I think in the video I said that I felt our recoup period would be inside of two years. At the pace we're doing stuff already I bet it'll only be about half that. Tremendously useful tools for anyone in this hobby.

Toyman!
Toyman! MegaDork
4/19/22 10:48 a.m.

The savings in lost time alone makes the machines worth it. No more loading up tires and wheels to haul them down to the tire store and then sit around and wait. 

After Firestone refused to mount a set of Hoosiers for the Abomination because they weren't the correct tire for the car, I gave up and ordered my own. They are worth every penny. 

 

ShinnyGroove (Forum Supporter)
ShinnyGroove (Forum Supporter) HalfDork
4/19/22 2:51 p.m.

I feel like a lot of us would go down this road if it weren't for the expense of the equipment and the floor space that it requires.  Does anyone have experience with the el cheapo manual stuff from Harbor freight or Northern Tool?  Even if the ROI math works on the Bendpak stuff, it's hard for me to justify putting a big chunk of my cash and my garage space into commercial grade stuff that will realistically be used 4-6 times a year.

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
4/19/22 2:59 p.m.
Toyman! said:

The savings in lost time alone makes the machines worth it. No more loading up tires and wheels to haul them down to the tire store and then sit around and wait. 

After Firestone refused to mount a set of Hoosiers for the Abomination because they weren't the correct tire for the car, I gave up and ordered my own. They are worth every penny. 

 

Yes to the time savings. Plus, sometimes JG & Ducks Tire Svc. sometimes offers delivery. smiley

Toyman!
Toyman! MegaDork
4/19/22 5:21 p.m.

In reply to ShinnyGroove (Forum Supporter) :

I have fought a set of 275 RE71s. Several times. I can not imagine doing that with a manual machine. It would take forever and you would be exhausted by the end. Even with the machine they can be challenging. 

Regular street tires would be fairly easy though. 

wae
wae PowerDork
4/19/22 5:28 p.m.
ShinnyGroove (Forum Supporter) said:

I feel like a lot of us would go down this road if it weren't for the expense of the equipment and the floor space that it requires.  Does anyone have experience with the el cheapo manual stuff from Harbor freight or Northern Tool?  Even if the ROI math works on the Bendpak stuff, it's hard for me to justify putting a big chunk of my cash and my garage space into commercial grade stuff that will realistically be used 4-6 times a year.

I've got the manual machine and you don't want to do that.  I've done car tires before but it is h a r d work.  The stiffer the sidewall the more impossible.

Trailer tires and ATV/mower tires?  Absolutely!  The manual machine does just fine for those.  High-sidewall car tires on steelies?  Meh, if you're desperate.  Aluminum wheels?  Those will get destroyed.  Low profile tire? Just give up.

I really want to add a tire machine to the shop, but the floorspace required makes it a tough call. 

rande
rande New Reader
4/19/22 7:12 p.m.

NTW once refused to mount my Hoosier tires because there was no tread.  

JG Pasterjak
JG Pasterjak Production/Art Director
4/19/22 10:31 p.m.

Yeah I think the big thing for a lot of people is the space and infrastructure requirements. I have a fairly large shop, but even for me they take up a substantial amount of room, and they're not exactly the kinds of things you can just move out of the way when you aren't using them. 

But when it comes to doing the math on recoup, don't just compare it to how many sets you're mounting now, because when you can just do the stuff any time you want you find reasons to do it all the time. I have a set of Hoosiers that I'd have probably not even used again if it meant a $130 bill and time shuttling tires, but I'm going to a local event in a couple weeks so I'll throw them back on and squeeze the last bit of life out of them before tossing them. Flip the tires on the wife's CX-5 so she gets 20,000 miles out of them instead of 15,000? Heck yeah. Throw a bunch of different sized tires on some wheels to see what fits on the MR2? No problem. 

But, yeah, they chonk.

Toyman!
Toyman! MegaDork
4/20/22 7:51 a.m.

They do eat up some space in the shop. They are also the most used large shop tools I own so I consider that a fair trade. 

My shop is 26 x 26. They aren't overwhelming in their size. 

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APEowner
APEowner SuperDork
4/20/22 8:02 a.m.

Like drywall taping and mudding, concrete work, roofing and paint and bodywork I know how to mount and balance tires but I don't like doing it and I'd just as soon pay someone else to do it.

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