Car Catcher: One of One, 514-Cubic-Inch Pantera

This 1973 De Tomaso Pantera is billed as one of a kind: 514-cubic-inch engine, billet suspension all around, and then that wine color. The ZF transmission was recently rebuilt, while the Michelins are fresh. Despite the radical engine, it still runs on 93-octane fuel. 

This one will cross the block during Carlisle Auction’s upcoming Lakeland Winter Auction.  Find more details here.

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AngryCorvair
AngryCorvair MegaDork
2/3/20 2:29 p.m.

the population of bonertown is growing.

David S. Wallens
David S. Wallens Editorial Director
2/3/20 5:22 p.m.

In reply to AngryCorvair :

So, see you at the Carlisle auction?

mrichlen
mrichlen New Reader
2/4/20 9:45 a.m.

Beautiful Car.  Question though, why is the "heavy" end of the ujointed half shaft toward the hub instead of the diff.  I know it is mimimal but less unstrung weight. 

Brian_13
Brian_13 New Reader
2/4/20 6:40 p.m.
mrichlen said:

Question though, why is the "heavy" end of the ujointed half shaft toward the hub instead of the diff.  I know it is mimimal but less unstrung weight. 

Fair question. Two notes:

- the outboard end is a large hollow tube, while the inboard end is smaller in diameter and probably solid. For the same torsional strength and stiffness the larger tube will be lighter... so is the heavy end really toward the hub?

- there may be clearance issues on the inboard end, to the frame.

mrichlen
mrichlen New Reader
2/5/20 9:35 p.m.

In reply to Brian_13 :

Well sir, you are correct.  I am a restoring an old sports/racer with IRS with the  universal jointed half shafts on the shelf.  I weighed the ends on my postal scale with the other end at the same height.  The 'hollow tube" end was several ounces lighter.  Learn something every day. 

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